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Oil tight Austin Seven?
#51
(09-10-2018, 09:25 PM)Zetomagneto Wrote:
(09-10-2018, 10:08 AM)JonE Wrote: well, trying to be as optimistic as possible, at least he didn't do it on an even earlier, rarer car.

At least the body is staying with the car, which is not something which can always be said with ulsteroids...
Why is there so much fuss, it’s only an RP , there are plenty around but perhaps only one electric.
It appears to have made available lots of parts for others.It has an owner, and it is his car to do as he wishes.
At some later stage this if it is offered for sale it can be returned to standard.
Nobody seams to make such a fuss when an alternative petrol engine is fitted.

(10-10-2018, 11:08 AM)JonE Wrote: Yes, let's face it, there are going to be a hell of lot of dusty Austin 7s waiting for a few hundred years until the remaining humanoid planet dwellers come back to sufficient numbers to be bothered to want to drive somewhere. Time to sell up if you live near the beach...

They'll be in demand Jon when none of the modern stuff works any more!
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#52
I was unaware that electric drive conversions for classic cars was past the daydream phase. A friend passed onto me his MG Car Club magazine which shows in detail the conversion to electric of his 1959 MGA. It appears to be a new business venture by the car’s owner. The company is E-driveretro and classic MGs are not the only vehicles he converts. Obviously I could have just Googled “electric drive vehicle conversions” to be enlightened. 60 to 100 mile range is hardly worth all the expense at this stage considering the current lack of public charging points in the UK. I wonder what we can call a petrol head who has converted to electric drive?
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#53
In reply to Dave's question on what to call a petrolhead with an electric car. What about An Amphead or anything else to do with electriclkery or WATT ever you want to call them.

John Masonl
Would you believe it "Her who must be obeyed" refers to my Ruby as the toy.

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#54
The infrastructure is going to be a big problem with EVs. It's starting to be seen here. Battery density is increasing but the charge times still remain fairly long. The equivalent of a petrol station with pumps where you can come in, completely refill (recharge) your car then drive off in minutes just isn't there with an EV.

A full charge on an EV takes hours even with a decent power supply. The idea seems to be most people will charge up over night ready for the next day or days use. 20 minutes seems to be the average time to charge to 80% for most EVs on a fast charger. For some reason the last 20% takes longer (something to do with battery chemistry?). Most people won't have fast chargers in their homes of course, the domestic supply can't supply enough current.

I worked in the UK in 1995 for a company doing EVs back then and we had the same problem. The batteries were no where near as good (this is pre Lithium) but there were two charging methods. A slow, overnight charge, limited by the 13A or so domestic supply, and a fast 3 phase charger. But not many people have 3 phase into their house.

There are fast recharging stations about the place now and I think some of them in NZ are free. But the issue is it takes time, that 20 minutes to 80%. When there aren't many people using them it's not too bad, drive up, plug in and go away for 20 minutes. Probably they go into the petrol station and buy a frappy wankachino or whatever coffee petrol stations sell now - worst idea ever by the way, I get so annoyed at going to buy petrol and having to wait in line to pay while someone else is having coffee made, a seemingly 5 minute plus process. Thank goodness for pay at pump!

Anyway, here they have started seeing issues where people are using the free charge stations and going away leaving the car there to charge. Meanwhile someone else comes along to use it and can't and are left waiting until the previous owner decides to come back. Then they presumably use it for their 20 minutes and so on.

At the moment there aren't many EVs around so it's not such an issue but it's going to be. Even all the documentation about around ([Only registered and activated users can see the links Click here to register]) this seems to assume you're the only person likely to be using them, fine while EV uptake is still low.

But what happens when most people have EVs come holiday times when everyone travels (and in NZ there are quite a number of bottlenecks where you get thousands of cars passing through in peak times and massive delays) where will all those people stop to recharge? Look at any petrol station on those travel routes and the number of cars passing through in an hour (actually any petrol station on a Saturday morning) and the cars passing through is huge. What happens when you add in a 20 minute delay for each one.

Would be interesting to know how many petrol station stops are made per KM of journey for petrol cars compared to how many charging stops will be made per KM for EVs.

It's also interesting when you start comparing the actual battery capacities and range and charge times of EVs. The articles in favour of them often mix and match figures quoting the shortest charge times but with the longest ranges. Teslas are often picked out as an example but those are the high end cars and even with their fast superchargers the 80% charge time on a model S is about 40 minutes. It has a range of about 500km on a full charge. A Nissan Leaf, a more modest car mere mortals might buy, has a range of about 130km. Those ranges are based on a 100% charge too I guess, I am guessing an 80% charge gives less than 80% range?

People really don't understand exactly how much energy there is an a litre of petrol and what that in petrol engines lets us do. And I think people are just hoping that some breakthrough in battery tech will come along and give us near instant charge times.

That's not even getting into the issues of manufacture and recycling of old EVs when that starts becoming an issue. I suspect the immediate solution will be ship off old batteries to somewhere else who doesn't have the same environmental protections. We're staring to see the same issues with plastic recycling these days. It's getting even worse with the modern, upgrade cycle, mentality. What happens when your 5 year old car is now considered obsolete, no more software upgrades for you. We've already seen the likes of Apple (with older iPhones) and Tesla throttling devices over the air. With modern tech someone else has an awful lot of control over how you can use it.

It's a shame our poor little Austin 7s will start being looked upon as old fashioned polluters that MUST be removed from the roads when, as has been pointed out above somewhere, we have vastly less impact on the world now than most things on the road.

Simon

Oops, that turned into a bit of a rant Smile
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#55
(10-10-2018, 07:45 PM)jansens Wrote: Probably they go into the petrol station and buy a frappy wankachino or whatever coffee petrol stations sell now - worst idea ever by the way, I get so annoyed at going to buy petrol and having to wait in line to pay while someone else is having coffee made, a seemingly 5 minute plus process. Thank goodness for pay at pump!

You raise some interesting points there Simon which I will not comment on for professional reasons (much as I love to!)

I can report though the good news that pay at pump has arrived in Norway since my last visit 10 years ago, and my goodness what a leap forward that is! Nigh every petrol station in the country has a hot dog bar and the one or two holiday-jobs behind the counter always served both food and petrol so the queues were interminable. Made so much worse by the fact that as a mere English visitor my budget wouldn't stretch to hot dogs!

I was equally surprised that the old road toll machines have been replaced by a camera system. We were completely unaware of this until we'd driven through a number of them and thus spent much of our trip waiting to be pulled over by the rozzers. As it happens your number plate is traced and you get a bill a month or two later. Good to know if you are heading that way, this info is (anyway was) conspicuously absent from the RAC's motoring advice.

Sorry, is that off-topic?
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#56
You raise some interesting points there Simon which I will not comment on for professional reasons (much as I love to!)

Eh ?
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#57
Perhaps Chris works for one of the larger car manufacturers and is currently involved in projects concerning some of the points raised by Simon, maybe...

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#58
(11-10-2018, 07:06 AM)Ruairidh Dunford Wrote: Perhaps Chris works for one of the larger car manufacturers and is currently involved in projects concerning some of the points raised by Simon, maybe...

Yes, that. We are allowed to hold opinions but expressing them to the world at large can result in the abrupt lack of a profession...
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#59
I don't know either, intriguing!

Chris, if you were local I'd say lets go for a pint and a chat Smile

The problem with all this new technology is everyone who has a say in it has an angle. The car companies want to sell cars (and lie to do so), the media just want to sell stories about it (and lie to do so), the electricity companies want to sell power, the governments (who just lie) will say whatever they think is most popular with the people, and the people just believe whatever the aforementioned groups say, come up with their own "informed" opinion and stick to it no matter what. There doesn't seem to be a lot of rational thought in the world these days, just strong opinions.

Not just this topic I mean, in general. This is probably nothing new, I think I am just getting old Smile

I have no strong opinions on this particular project. It looks interesting and I will be keen to see how it goes and what the result is. Best of luck to the builder. I understand the idea of a project just for the projects sake, not the end result. With my own projects anyone who says "why didn't you just do X" has usually completely missed the point!

Simon

(11-10-2018, 07:44 AM)Chris KC Wrote:
(11-10-2018, 07:06 AM)Ruairidh Dunford Wrote: Perhaps Chris works for one of the larger car manufacturers and is currently involved in projects concerning some of the points raised by Simon, maybe...

Yes, that. We are allowed to hold opinions but expressing them to the world at large can result in the abrupt lack of a profession...
I understand that one too! No problem Chris.

Simon
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#60
I imagine we'd find much to talk about Simon! Some day...
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