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Oil tight Austin Seven?
#1
Is this the only way to make them oil tight?

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Appears to have been quite an original and straight car prior to the conversion.
Whatever you do, don't take my word for it!

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#2
Seems a bit extreme - I found silicon gaskets all round did a really good job - for about 300 miles!

These days, with the general public used to modern cars, it is a conversation starter:

" Do you realise there is something wrong with your car? - there is oil coming from underneath...."

Simon
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#3
Doing this went through my mind as well for a while. It will be interesting to see how it all pans out.

Jamie.
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#4
(05-10-2018, 08:58 AM)Jamie Wrote: Doing this went through my mind as well for a while. It will be interesting to see how it all pans out.

Jamie.

Mine leaks a little, don't they all but I had someone tell me in a car park last week that it had a few scratches !!!
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#5
I think I recognise the name recently on the forum - was a post on one of the for sale items... why not tell us more here?

Would be great to experience such a thing, as it would alert to all the other squeaks groans and bangs from everywhere else!
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#6
It's technically interesting and could even be quite cool if the motor were something antique with lots of brass and copper....but the essential justification appears to be that the owner is appalled by vintage machinery...
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#7
Unless there are two RP saloons being converted to electric, this one resides a mile away.
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#8
First, I have to hold my hand up and admit that I was involved in "facilitating" the sale of this car on behalf of a friend.

I'm appalled by what's been/is being done to it.

Many will have seen Ruairidh's recent post about his overhaul and conservation of a very original RN. As you can see from the photos in the link, this RP was likewise complete, solid, largely unmolested and in a delightfully patinated condition; altogether a very rare survivor. I've never seen another original sliding roof still in working order! Apart from a slipping clutch it ran and drove well. All that it needed was some TLC to make it a really lovely example of a car that's grown old with dignity.

Now all of that has gone.

We had hoped that it would find a loving home with someone who appreciated it for what it was; indeed, had I been able to afford the asking price, I'd have dearly liked to have bought it myself.

Whether the project will ever be completed successfully remains to be seen, and DVLA's attitude to the conversion will be interesting to hear about.
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#9
Interesting project and completely reversible apparently but to me a case of just because you can doesn’t mean you should.
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#10
(05-10-2018, 09:31 AM)Chris KC Wrote: It's technically interesting and could even be quite cool if the motor were something antique with lots of brass and copper....but the essential justification appears to be that the owner is appalled by vintage machinery...

I don't think that there's going to be anything "antique" about this.  Note the polycarbonate roof fixed with aluminium bead where a "horrible" original, working sunroof used to be!

(05-10-2018, 10:45 AM)Simon Scott Wrote: Interesting project and completely reversible apparently but to me a case of just because you can doesn’t mean you should.

Hardly "reversible", given that he's disposing of so much of the original fabric of the car!
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