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Wheel nut torque on new studs
#1
I've fitted brand new wheel studs all round on my hillclimb special, and would like advice please on the correct torque for tightening the steel nuts (fitted with correct tapered washers, as required for competition cars).
Cheers,
Colin.
Cheers,

Colin.
1932 single seat special "The Moose"
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#2
I would have thought that, unless the precise material that the studs and nuts are made from is known, it going to be impossible to quote a figure. Also, if a torque wrench is used, it robs one of the 'feel' that's so important in not overstaining things - overdo it and the threads might strip or the yield point reached and the fastening about to snap.
I'd tighten using a socket and normal bar until it 'feels right'. As a competition car is only ever used for comparatively short runs, it's easy enough to keep checking that things are not loosening off. On a road-going 7, using the standard wheel spanner - its size handily limits how much torque you can apply - one usually finds that after a run of 20 miles or so, a slight increase in tightness can be made. After that, I find they stay tight for a very long time. What does everybody else think?
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#3
(30-11-2023, 07:50 PM)Tony Griffiths Wrote:  What does everybody else think?

I agree with everything you have said Tony. I don't possess a torque wrench!
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#4
Another factor is what sort of nuts you are using - if any kind of prevailing torque lock nut is used then a variable (extra) amount of the applied torque is gobbled up overcoming friction, so torque values become less meaningful. FWIW I strongly recommend using nylocs and I do them up by feel until the joint goes 'hard'. Do not overtighten them - nobody should be allowed near a wheel nut with extension bars. And check them again after a little running just to make sure.
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#5
Thanks everyone for your advice.
Cheers,

Colin.
1932 single seat special "The Moose"
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#6
With cars used in competitions where the stresses and strains exceed that of normal road use it is just as important to check wheel and other nuts remain tight regularly. Our trials car has paint pen lines across many of the larger nuts and bolts so we can see what is coming loose. Its supprising what does come loose and also the few tricks we have developed to stop some of the common issues as well as the hints we have had from fellow competitors.
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#7
I would favour using nyloc nuts and nip them up by feel.  I use thick steel washers under the nuts and have never had any problems over twenty-odd years of motoring on mostly rural roads. Whilst discussing wheel nuts, mention should be made of the importance of ensuring that the wheels sit comfortably on the brake drums and dowels, especially if the wheels have been powder coated or repainted.  I check the wheel nuts before any long run in the car.  They only need tightening very infrequently, generally due to the steel washers having dished slightly.   You shouldn't have this problem with the fancy dished washers you racing chaps use!
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#8
Thanks Malcolm, and best wishes to you and Margaret.
Cheers,

Colin.
1932 single seat special "The Moose"
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#9
(05-12-2023, 10:41 AM)Malcolm Parker Wrote: I would favour using nyloc nuts and nip them up by feel.  I use thick steel washers under the nuts and have never had any problems over twenty-odd years of motoring on mostly rural roads. Whilst discussing wheel nuts, mention should be made of the importance of ensuring that the wheels sit comfortably on the brake drums and dowels, especially if the wheels have been powder coated or repainted.  I check the wheel nuts before any long run in the car.  They only need tightening very infrequently, generally due to the steel washers having dished slightly.   You shouldn't have this problem with the fancy dished washers you racing chaps use!

That took me straight back to a grand day out last summer, Malcolm!
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