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Saving Eversure
#1
I thought  you all might be interested in how I saved an original Eversure oil filler that I bought from Tony B. It had two broken sides of the cone that fits in the crankcase.

Carefully clamped in the mill I removed the other two and machined the bottom flat leaving a witness mark. 0.008" removed.

  I then carefully bored the filler to make the cast hole round, machined up a stepped ring and Loctited it in place 
   
A plate was made to fit inside the crankcase which will be retained by two small countersunk screws.

Finally a new clip to replace the broken plated brass item, made from a stainless steel strip used to fix road signs to the post.
  
This will enable the Eversure filler to be fitted or the original cover, or even a latter style filler a la  Ulster.
  
The only deviation from original is two 3mm holes in the crankcase which are masked by any of the covers. 
 I hasten to say that I am highly delighted with saving a 80+year old accessory.


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#2
Excellent work Robert! You should consider doing that kind of thing professionally... Wink
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#3
Nice one Robert,

Those original accessories are net easy to get anymore.

Tony.
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#4
As always, Robert, I am greatly impressed by the quality of work I see on the Friends website. And further, that saving old(er) parts is possible. I am in awe that in another 80 years, there will still be people driving their Austin Sevens.
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#5
Lovely work Robert.  I have never seen one. Can you please explain what it does and how it does it?
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#6
(08-11-2017, 08:25 AM)Nick Salmon Wrote: Lovely work Robert.  I have never seen one. Can you please explain what it does and how it does it?

Basically it provides a fixed rectangular topped funnel as an oil filler, which is a great improvement on trying to pour oil from a height into an awkwardly placed hole.
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#7
Thanks Robert (L). What an excellent device. I want one! Robert (F) please start manufacturing. Smile
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#8
Hello Rob, how did you manage without CAD/CAM?
Regards from the creative county - Staffordshire
Stuart
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#9
a word to the wise, and I'm sure Robert will back me up.

As I think I had 4 or 5 of these on the shelf when Robert last came round.

Be careful if you are looking for one of these, as they were also made for the ford model T or A. They look the same, but are a different shape. And fit a larger hole.

They won't go onto the austin 7 engine.

Have fun looking for them though.

Tony.
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#10
Thanks for the kind words. 
   Stuart I repaired it using CAD, which was my brain and CAM, which was my brain operating my hands, ha, ha.
   Nick, you will need a magneto engined car to fit one of these to. 
Austin in the shed used to make them and might produce some more if you ask him. 
   Tony, as you say they were also fitted to the model A and can catch out the unwary. 
   Next up Enots air pump.
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