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Steering Overhaul
#11
When I was buying my RP earlier this year I noticed the owner was in the habit of turning the steering from lock to lock whilst the car was stationary while manoeuvring the car out of his garage. I took this as a bad sign for the steering arm and the first thing I did after buying the car was to remove the arm and clean the paint off. Sure enough there were cracks in the inside of the elbow. One of David Cochrane's replacements was ordered and fitted. 

I can't say for certain that the previous owner's habit of steering whilst stationary caused the crack, but it can't have helped. I never move the steering wheel unless the car is moving.
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#12
Bear in mind these original steering arms are over 80 years old so they have done well to last this long.
And yes BC did remind us somewhile ago of the importance to check the steering arms, for some reason it didn’t go down particularly well even though it was sound advice.Some on here seem to like to have a go at BC, he does not retaliate and for that alone he deserves commendation.
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#13
Thinking of my past use and abuse I am putting one on my Christmas present list (no list so the only item).
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#14
A couple more questions from me:
Firstly, and I feel like this is probably going to be a question without a straightforward answer, but is there a generally accepted off the shelf type of oil/grease to fill the steering box with? When I dismantled the box the grease had mostly been displaced from the gear faces, so I'd guess wasn't actually doing all that much. My intention is to lubricate the gears on final assembly with graphite grease.

Secondly, what was the factory finish for the steering box? Was it simply painted black all over?

Any answers greatly appreciated!
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#15
I use graphite grease in my steering box a 33 one in cast steel, which was painted black. I dont think the alloy ones were ever painted.
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#16
I use Penrite Steering Box Lubricant. Stays put quite well and does climb the column.
Jim
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#17
I am using SAE140 in my RP's steering box, having had difficulty with grease climbing the steering column. It appears that the worm acts as an Archimedes screw and winds the lubricant up the column on right hand turns but doesn't bring it back on left hand turns. Oil runs back, but grease tends to stay put. Result: the column gradually fills with grease and it exudes from under the steering wheel all over your nice clean best trousers. I speak from personal experience, and graphited grease stains are the very devil to get out!
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#18
Yes I agree with David. The resulting upward forced grease depositing itself on your trousers. The result being you get the sharp end of her who must be obeyed’s tongue. Don’t ask me how I know. It can be cleaned off however with a good amount of clean petrol on clean kitchen paper and neat fairy washing up liquid followed by a normal wash in the washing machine and a good amount of airing time on the washing line. That’s the how I got my stripes back.

John Mason.
Would you believe it "Her who must be obeyed" refers to my Ruby as the toy.

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#19
Thanks all, the Penrite steering box lubricant looks like what I'm after, and appears to be half way between oil and grease which I'd imagine should limit upward travel. Shouldn't the felt bush at the top of the column limit the amount of grease which gets past?
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#20
"Shouldn't the felt bush at the top of the column limit the amount of grease which gets past?"

Felt bushes are not very good at keeping anything in, especially if they haven't been changed for years as is often the case for steering column bushes. In any case, if the grease is being wound up the column, it is going to be under some pressure.
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