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BRAKES WHAT'S NORMAL
#1
Recommissioning my A7 could somebody explain what's normal with regards to the rear brakes.

The vehicle has stood for many years and the initial test drive at time of purchase was limited but it was obvious the brakes needed attention i.e they didn't work!

Front brakes were fine but these only worked the front via the handbrake.

Removing the rear drums, showed signs of oil, not on the shoes themselves but on the stud flange and a trace at the bottom of the back plate. Question is this normal?
The shoes look fine although I plan to replace. The drums however are rusty and pitted, is it possible to skim? or should I replace these as well.
Cables look good no fraying but is it normal for the n/s cable to have two turn screw adjusters side by side, this seems strange not sure why I have two. 

One again 
Many thanks
Paul
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#2
No rear brakes can sometimes be the result of the levers having been fitted incorrectly. They should hang down and be angled slightly towards the rear of the car.
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#3
Only ONE screw adjuster per cable is permitted (if you must) according to Constructiion and Use requirements. .. If the cables/shoes are that far out of adjustment it might be prudent to consider changing for a pair of new, adjustable ones.
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#4
What age of car do you have?
Pre 1930 cars are uncoupled. So foot brake to rear and handbrake to front. This may be why your handbrake only works on the front.

Good brakes can easily be a heaved, and by a number of different ways. And others will point out each way.

Personly I have put new linnings matched in with new cast iron drums. And new cables. If anything the brakes are to good for a light sports model. No problem in locking up the brakes.

Tony.
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#5
I take it the car is an early model with uncoupled brakes, and not  a later type set up with excessive front lead. 
Unlike the later, the workings of uncoupled are fully evident by examining. The hub faces and gasket seal the hub grease. Many flanges are now far from flat. A soaked gasket with long standing will seep oil. And removing the brake drum screws takes all pressure off the gasket. As per other posts just half fill diff.
The drums are very thin but many have been skimmed nonetheless. Does not improve lever angles. If going to scrap linings anyway, clean the drums with emery paper and see what happens. May be OK with acceptable shoe wear (beware asbestos dust).
New linings must be specifically for the car. Material as used in moderns are hopeless.
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#6
i drove an uncoupled car for the first time this summer. A chummy. Rears by footbrake are awesomme. Lock both up no problem. Slows down far better than my 6 months younger saloon with coupled brakes.
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#7
My tuppence Paul:

The standard system works alright if it is in adjustment and if slop / friction in the various linkages is eliminated as far as possible. Ideally set it up so all the various levers are operating at right angles when just about to apply, for best mechanical advantage.

I personally wouldn't lose too much sleep over a trace of oil in the hubs if the shoes are dry, not in the short term at least.

Rust on the drums externally is no problem, but the braking surfaces need to be cleaned up. Will they respond to gentle work with emery? Failing that a light skim might be considered, but A7 drums are already a bit on the thin side. Worth considering new drums if they are poor (I had some of Tony's and can recommend them).

Reckless is right, only one adjuster allowed per cable (you really shouldn't need two).
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#8
(21-01-2019, 08:12 PM)Tony Betts Wrote: What age of car do you have?
Pre 1930 cars are uncoupled. So foot brake to rear and handbrake to front. This may be why your handbrake only works on the front.

Good brakes can easily be a heaved, and by a number of different ways. And others will point out each way.

Personly I have put new linnings matched in with new cast iron drums. And new cables. If anything the brakes are to good for a light sports model. No problem in locking up the brakes.

Tony.
Reinforcing what Tony says, I have a 1929 chummy with uncoupled brakes using his cast iron drums and woven linings. The retardation doesn't match my modern 4x4 but is perfectly adequate for the light A7 car on 3.50" tyres!!
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#9
The condition of the brake lever bushes is important. Too worn, and they introduce really unacceptable free play. I found replacing these transformed the braking effectiveness.

Bushes are readily available via cherished suppliers Smile

I'm planning to replace my brake drums with the Tony Betts cast iron versions as my pressed examples are so badly oval they can induce motion sickness on long descents.

Can't find an appropriate emoticon (need a green one!).

Bob
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#10
It is well worth just trying to improve what you have, first.

I changed my back axle - just swapped it for another, without doing any work on it at all.

The rear brakes did almost nothing.

So I took off the (steel, not cast iron) drums and found they were quite rusty, with gummy deposits on them.

The shoes were similarly grubby, but not obviously soaked in oil.

I cleaned the linings with a rag and thinners until the rag stopped being dirty.

I sanded the drums with a medium wet and dry, lubricated with Plus Gas.   Only until the worst of the dirt and rust were off, not polished or even cleaned off 100 percent.

Maybe a couple of hours work, tops.

Now, the offside wheel locks, and I am sure the nearside will as well, once I have got them balanced.

Quite pleased with that result.

Simon
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