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scuttle fuel tanks and minimising fire risk
#11
With Chummy scuttle tanks, make sure that the cap gasket is intact and in good condition. If not, sharp reversing with a full tank can shower the engine bay and catch fire. Happened to me once.
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#12
(01-02-2018, 02:32 PM)Steve Bryant Wrote:     If someone knows the dimensions of the gauze filter cone for the filler neck  I'm sure that those of us who can make such things would be very grateful  for the information.
Stephen

Steve,

Overall height:                               2.750"
Diameter of gauze cylinder:             1.125"
Diameter of top lip:                        1.500"

I agree with Nick about it preventing surging of petrol out of the filler but, perversely, I always remove the filter when filling up. With the volume and force which modern pumps deliver fuel, the filter cannot cope and one ends up with fuel all over the engine...and yourself!
Also remember there are two types of cap to the filler. The earlier screw type and the later bayonet.

Of added interest to those with early cars is that the fuel tap from the tank is situated directly over the exhaust manifold. Taps leak, Austins realised this could cause problems and so moved it further outboard.


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#13
In the many years of owning Austin 7s of primarily the scuttle fuel tank variety, I've never witnessed a fire and I'm amazed at the amount of fuel that can spew over a very hot exhaust from a leaking carburettor without this issue. But obviously there's always a first time! The only fire I witnessed was one caused as usual by human error when a friend insisted on keeping his Chummy's engine running while refuelling, fortunately quickly extinguished with a blanket. The recommendations of using the cylindrical fuel filter (generally useless for its intended purpose....it's too slow) and never filling to the brim are very good. Always carry a spare gallon but not on a continental ferry as in my experience it is not allowed.
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#14
Does anyone supply the bayonet top gasket? Or if not, has someone a material for that? cork?

If you haven't got a fuel filter (and they arent much use anyway for purpose), then a simpler internal 'cap' - which will stop flow to the outer cap whilst underway - might be something to make up? (using the spec top of the original fuel filter for its seating)
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#15
(01-02-2018, 04:19 PM)JonE Wrote: Does anyone supply the bayonet top gasket? Or if not, has someone a material for that? cork?

If you haven't got a fuel filter (and they arent much use anyway for purpose), then a simpler internal 'cap' - which will stop flow to the outer cap whilst underway - might be something to make up? (using the spec top of the original fuel filter for its seating)

Fuel Filters and the similar Oil Filter from the early magneto motor  (distinguished from the fuel filter  by only having one layer of course gauze as opposed to the combined fine and course gauze) used to appear on eBay at very high prices. 

Could be made up but probably costing as much as  an original. Not sure how useful (having to be removed for filling both oil and fuel) but may stop surge as suggested.

Cheers, Tony.
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#16
I changed my trials Chummy cap for a new crew on type to try to stop spillage, but have yet to find a good spill proof way of venting it. There is very little clearance above the cap under the bonnet. Any ideas welcome, please!
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