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rear axle casing bend?
#1
I know there was another thread somewhere, but I'm starting to wonder whether the difficultly getting my O/S spring pin in (I ground a small lead to push it home) could be indicative of a slight bend in the casing on that side. Whilst it might all sort out when I put the bearings and hubs on, that halfshaft feels quite tight to one side of the space it emerges from.
Am I overworrying about this, or is this tension which will quickly go once it all starts operating as one unit? Thanks...
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#2
Hi Jon

I had a badly welded casing on an axle I had.  It manifested itself as the inability to mesh the gears well and by causing the drum to catch on the backplate. Both conspired to make the axle unbearably noisy.

The axle tubes should be completely straight and can be checked with a straight edge. I doubt if the bell end of the tubes would bend before the tubes have distorted to an obvious degree.

Cheers

Howard
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#3
I had similar problems fitting a rear spring pin on the Ulster.  It turned out to be a bent axle tube.  The car survived a trip to the Isle of Man but on the way back a halfshaft broke.  Somehow the diff locked up and I was able to get home.   I wouldn't chance it, get the axle off and check it.
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#4
The halfshaft end being biased towards the edge of the hole does seem like either a bent halfshaft or a bent axle case. Hopefully, this link to a previous thread on this subject will work: https://www.austinsevenfriends.co.uk/forum/showthread.php?tid=4561&pid=49020&highlight=bent+axle#pid49020
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#5
Thanks all, and thanks for the other thread which I remember seeing now.
If the cold bend is easy with the right kit, could I do it with the half shaft in situ to centre it?
What do you think from the photo?  It wasn't picked up when the axle was re-assembled, only when I found the eye difficult!    
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#6
ouch!
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#7
Not a case for a tight fitting unworn standard tolerance bearing!
What is the back story to this? Presumably not previously running OK. Or was the bearing loose in the hub? It has to be straight with the other side and square to the joining flange. Territory for the experienced or uncommonly resourceful.
Decades ago a young colleague had an axle break and it shot acros and locked the diff. The car steered with power on/off. He was a mechanic apprentice and much perplexed.
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#8
Crikey!
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#9
That, sir, is bent!!

A very successful trials competitor well known to many of us had a bent axle half after a trial some years ago. He's a farmer and therefore has the services of a retained agrigultural engineering contractor with some very big kit and an inventive mind. The axle half was loaded in his VERY large lathe, the tool post wound up hard against the axle half and set off along it on a very slow speed. Two passes straightened the thing out. The lathe survived but given its size, it would. However, his axle was bent about mid way, yours appears to be towards the outer end so, maybe, that wouldn't work.

Steve
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#10
hmmmm... well perhaps the pic is a little more distorted than in actuality, as this has just been re-assembled, so am head-scratching a bit why it didn't alert - although perhaps I didn't ask.
It hadn't been used since dismantling in the 70s... and that was why I wanted a quick check of the innards. Which were ok apparently, just needing a shim.

It seems like a new case might be more reliable for the longer term...? I'll add it to the to-do list. Glad I haven't assembled anything more. And I'm guessing 'that' spring pin may be toast now.
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