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RP Door Adjustment
#11
(08-01-2018, 06:07 PM)Martin Prior Wrote:
(08-01-2018, 01:05 PM)Reckless Rat Wrote: In a similar vein, is there a reasonably easy method for rectifing the typical "brewer's droop" of the RP saloon doors?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/austin7nut/4289738185/

A lovely car!

The usual problem is that the whole scuttle has dropped relative to the B-post, probably because the mounting points to the front cross-member outriggers have rotted out.  Plating and packing should cure this.

Not my car, Martin (cut & pasted from Pinterest) but thanks for your reply. Something I need to investigate because the driver's door seems to be sagging more than it was, and it's not the hinges. Would I be right in assuming that I would need to loosen ALL the body mounting points before resorting to packing the scuttle? I've never had the body off this car, although it probably has been at some time. Should this be done with the doors attached?
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#12
(08-01-2018, 07:06 PM)Reckless Rat Wrote:
(08-01-2018, 06:07 PM)Martin Prior Wrote:
(08-01-2018, 01:05 PM)Reckless Rat Wrote: In a similar vein, is there a reasonably easy method for rectifing the typical "brewer's droop" of the RP saloon doors?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/austin7nut/4289738185/

A lovely car!

The usual problem is that the whole scuttle has dropped relative to the B-post, probably because the mounting points to the front cross-member outriggers have rotted out.  Plating and packing should cure this.

Not my car, Martin (cut & pasted from Pinterest) but thanks for your reply. Something I need to investigate because the driver's door seems to be sagging more than it was, and it's not the hinges. Would I be right in assuming that I would need to loosen ALL the body mounting points before resorting to packing the scuttle? I've never had the body off this car, although it probably has been at some time. Should this be done with the doors attached?


I only loosen the bolts along the front cross-member and then jack the body up along this line - you want the B-posts to stay where they are.  Go carefully, listen for any nasty creaks and cracks and keep a close eye on the fit of the doors, which should be left in place and closed.  Pack the mountings when you're happy with the alignment of the doors.  It sounds brutal and crude, but it's always worked for me.
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#13
Thanks, I'll give it a go and post before & after pics for reference. Fingers crossed!
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#14
I love AYV23. The fellow who originally “restored” the green/black  RP featured a few months back would be in ecstasy with that one. Cars in near  that state were to be found here to early 1960s but anything with a hint of rust was eliminated from the roads by absurdly pedantic  w.o.f standards 40 or so years ago. The cars were not designed for long body life The car depicts all the common defects. The door bottoms were made to rot out early. (That handiwork as Martins was doused in every rain) The battered rear guards very typical (even on cars with bumpers!). Rear window leaks have contributed to rust above the guards and behind spare wheel.. Much of the rear floor and behind guards of my own car was replaced inside15 years. Although the car did begin life in a wind blasted seaside suburb and would have been driven through saltwater puddles. (Yet unlike moderns the radiator is not corroded). The original paint must have been very lacking as little subsequent damage despite years outside.
 
I am mightily surprised by Martins findings. The RP is an odd structure. The chassis extension is too light to support adults plus kids in the back plus a carrier and the slightly reinforced body carries much of the load. Leaky window seals caused much early corrosion in the rear floor area. I have always assumed the consequent rear sag pulled the top of A and B posts back to produce lozenged door openings and the typical RP appearance. I cannot find my giant wallpaper square but I am sure I have verified in the past. The next visitor will get a job holding strings. I assumed raising of the rear body might assist if sag not too locked in by welded repairs, and steel roof, as mine.
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#15
(10-01-2018, 08:46 AM)Bob Culver Wrote: I love AYV23. The fellow who originally “restored” the green/black  RP featured a few months back would be in ecstasy with that one. Cars in near  that state were to be found here to early 1960s but anything with a hint of rust was eliminated from the roads by absurdly pedantic  w.o.f standards 40 or so years ago. The cars were not designed for long body life The car depicts all the common defects. The door bottoms were made to rot out early. (That handiwork as Martins was doused in every rain) The battered rear guards very typical (even on cars with bumpers!). Rear window leaks have contributed to rust above the guards and behind spare wheel.. Much of the rear floor and behind guards of my own car was replaced inside15 years. Although the car did begin life in a wind blasted seaside suburb and would have been driven through saltwater puddles. (Yet unlike moderns the radiator is not corroded). The original paint must have been very lacking as little subsequent damage despite years outside.
 
I am mightily surprised by Martins findings. The RP is an odd structure. The chassis extension is too light to support adults plus kids in the back plus a carrier and the slightly reinforced body carries much of the load. Leaky window seals caused much early corrosion in the rear floor area. I have always assumed the consequent rear sag pulled the top of A and B posts back to produce lozenged door openings and the typical RP appearance. I cannot find my giant wallpaper square but I am sure I have verified in the past. The next visitor will get a job holding strings. I assumed raising of the rear body might assist if sag not too locked in by welded repairs, and steel roof, as mine.

Yes, AYV23 is a thing of beauty!  We are currently helping a friend to sell a lovely unrestored runner in similar condition - but no door droop!  If I had the money, I'd buy it myself and leave it just as it is.

My theory with the door drop is that the relatively heavy doors are ultimately carried on the two small mounting points under the scuttle sides and that over time, aided by fatigue and corrosion, they simply hammer the A-post downwards relative to the B-post.        
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#16
(04-01-2018, 10:34 PM)Ruairidh Dunford Wrote: A stainless steel strap beneath the trim panel (with the correctly orientated twist in it) pinned from front top corner to bottom rear corner will pull the door in. I have also used a thin stainless steel rope rope and rigging adjuster to do the same job.

Hi Ruairidh, I am in the process of trying to pull the bottom corner of the RP doors in using your suggested method of the stainless strip. The protrusion is at the bottom of the door catch side.
You suggest fixing the strip from top corner to bottom rear corner.  How do I deal with the window winder mechanism that is in the way on top R/H corner.  The stainless will foul this.(Or have I missed something).
Smiley.
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#17
You need to fix it in such a way that it won't foul, move the fixing down.

You may need to use a Spanish windlass type system with thin wire and a small peg.

Can you post a picture of where you are at with it?
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#18
(16-01-2018, 09:28 PM)Ruairidh Dunford Wrote: You need to fix it in such a way that it won't foul, move the fixing down.

You may need to use a Spanish windlass type system with thin wire and a small peg.  

Can you post a picture of where you are at with it?

Yes ok. i'll try and get a picture posted in the morning. Cheers.
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#19
Hi Martin
 
Straying off the topic, but in the RP photo what are the bits and pieces around the lh hub?
 Despite the state the rear seat still retains somewhat plush look cf earlier models.
 I used ear indicators but behind the doors where less blinding at night. Legality now dubious here.
 
Whatever the cause, the lozenge shape of door aperture is the same. Jacking the scuttle sure by far the most practical remedy. To lift the rear and retain would probably need to cut the heavy gauge door frame fillet and the drive tunnel structure and more. Jacking extreme rear, or door aperture diagonals might persuade. Pack the outriggers, and  reweld. It might stay there. Many must have sorted. What did they do?
Reminds of mid 1950s  Vauxhalls when new. These now solid cars were considered frail and owners reported rear doors not fitting after towing caravans.
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#20
(16-01-2018, 09:41 PM)Smiley Wrote:
(16-01-2018, 09:28 PM)Ruairidh Dunford Wrote: You need to fix it in such a way that it won't foul, move the fixing down.

You may need to use a Spanish windlass type system with thin wire and a small peg.  

Can you post a picture of where you are at with it?

Yes ok. i'll try and get a picture posted in the morning. Cheers.
Hi Ruairidh,  I have abandoned trying to pull the corners of the RP in.  I tried the Stainless Strip method as suggested.
This failed, as I had to fix it halfway down the door because of the window winder mechanism being in the way, and it didn't give sufficient twist.
I then tried the Rigging Adjuster and stainless wire method.  With this I was able to go from the top of the door to the bottom corner diagonally without fouling the window winder.
THIS WORKED  WELL and pulled the corner in nicely.
However, When I replaced the door card, disaster struck.  The door wouldn't shut. because the door card was tight up against the sill.
On investigation, I find that during refurbishment by the previous owner, the thin plywood panel (used to stiffen the door) is not attached to the door frame along the bottom leaving a gap which in turn affects the fit of the door card.
The reason it is not attached is because the return flange on the door has been flattened and leaves nothing to attach
the plywood panel to.  Project abandoned.
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