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Use of Phoenix pressure fed 11/2" crank in a magneto crankxase
#1
I am very new to this forum and will be grateful for any advice
Can anyone advise if the above drank can be used in a magneto engine crankcase. From my observation one obvious  difference is the pressure fed nose casting which will differ from the coil engine. Can anyone suggest where such a casting might be sourced?
Thanks
Jim
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#2
(07-01-2021, 08:16 AM)jr2766 Wrote: I am very new to this forum and will be grateful for any advice
Can anyone advise if the above drank can be used in a magneto engine crankcase. From my observation one obvious  difference is the pressure fed nose casting which will differ from the coil engine. Can anyone suggest where such a casting might be sourced?
Thanks
Jim

Yes, it can be used and it does fit.
There are articles in the Companion and online about the process for fitting one into a coil engine and it's broadly the same. As for the nose piece I machined one from a lump of aluminium so never bothered to see who makes them. 

C
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#3
Thanks for taking the time t reply Charles
I have access to a casting - do you have a sketch of the assembly?
Cheers
Jim (runcimans@westnet.com.au)
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#4
Pre Phoenix back in the late seventies, when the new crankshafts were made by Gordon Allen, we all used magneto crankcases and machined a simple casting that took the place of the three bolt fabric oil seal housing. Hard to see in this photo as it is hidden below the gear driven supercharger and the Ulster style water pump welded to the front of a standard magneto model gear train housing. One of the two black flexible hoses from the external oil filter then feeds directly into the new nosepiece. Back then the crankshafts were supplied with a machined starting dog that easley accepted a modern lip seal.
Tony Johns


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#5
(08-01-2021, 02:38 AM)jr2766 Wrote: Thanks for taking the time t reply Charles
I have access to a casting - do you have a sketch of the assembly?
Cheers
Jim (runcimans@westnet.com.au)


Jim

I'll email you something later.
It's essentially a round bar of aluminium with a 7/8 blind hole to accommodate the oil feed dog. It's turned down to make a lip at the timing chest end to allow it to bolt on. The front end has a suitable lip seal fitted and the original thin steel plate that held the felt seal, now helps to retain the seal. Oil is feed into the bore via a drilling with a 1/2 BSP fitting on the outside.
I've got a new casting from Dave Dye for the whole oil bottle, with a starting handle and will need to machine that up in due course for the 10 stud crankcase


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c
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#6
Jim - got your message that you bought Hugh's '26 - Congrats.  There were some very early mag. crankcases that required some tunnel-boring to ensure a comfortable fit, but you'd be unlucky to strike one and then no problem.  Incidentally did you ever follow up if my ex-'25 was available?   Regards to Glenys.   Bill in Oz
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#7
HI Bill
Thanks for your kind comments
I certainly did follow up on your old car which is now owned by an enthusiast who has apparently poured money into a restoration which some say was unnecessary. The car is expected t be on the road later this year.
I'll keep you posted
Best Regards
Jim

Thanks Tony
A great historic photo
I've purchased Hugh Fryer's '26 car and need to have some wheel repairs done, fit new tyres and a new rad core. Planning to build a new engine but we'll concentrate on getting t on the road for the moment
Very Best Regards
Jim
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#8
Mag pressure feed


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#9
Looks very neat!
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