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All the tools you'll ever need...
#21
A Merchant Navy engineer friend told me that all he needed was a 5lb hammer, 14" Stillson and a large tin of Stag jointing compound.
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#22
Hi, Mike. I've pulled the curtain back, upped his stock of hammers- just in case he's stuck for the right one - snuck in a few machine tools, and given it a Christmas theme - the female ghost of Christmas future. She's holding - to keep it warm against her ample gifts - a gift for him, a large-capacity turbocharger ideal for improving the singer's rather miserable performance. "Will it fit?" she asks. "I'm sure I can make it." he replies.


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#23
(23-12-2020, 05:03 PM)Rogerfrench Wrote: A Merchant Navy engineer friend told me that all he needed was a 5lb hammer, 14" Stillson and a large tin of Stag jointing compound.
But they can open a door and get into the crank-case and even get the ladder in to get up to the top of the con-rod to fettle the little ends.
Dennis
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#24
(26-12-2020, 09:37 PM)Dennis Nicholas Wrote:
(23-12-2020, 05:03 PM)Rogerfrench Wrote: A Merchant Navy engineer friend told me that all he needed was a 5lb hammer, 14" Stillson and a large tin of Stag jointing compound.
But they can open a door and get into the crank-case and even get the ladder in to get up to the top of the con-rod to fettle the little ends.
Dennis

That ship was a triple-expansion steamer. Conrods in full view!
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#25
When I started work At the London Museum in 1963. There was the largest screwdriver I have ever seen. Evidently My boss who repaired the clocks in the collection ordered a No 1 clock makers screwdriver. In the wonders of the Estacode ordering system it was transposed to a 1" screwdriver. So they received a 1" wide blade on about a yard long screwdriver. We did find a use for it on some 19th century fire pumps. Pete
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#26
Steam engines: many of you will know of this engine at the Kelham Island Museum - but if not, it's well worth a visit. When it was first erected at its new site, the engineer in charge worked out that it would turn over on compressed air. To the utter disbelief of the workmen, who had just tightened down the last bolt, it did.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZjyKYvUQs0,
http://www.simt.co.uk/kelham-island-muse...don-engine
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#27
Thanks for that, fascinating.
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#28
The River Don Engine was originally used at what is now called Sheffield Forgemasters (of the Saddam Hussein giant gun fame) - it apparently was used to drive the main rolling mill in the works and was responsible for rolling all the armour plate for the first and second world war battleships. The big flywheel weighs 50 tons.
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#29
Amazing beast thundering at full chat then a quick stop and reverse. Well worth a visit. Pete
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#30
+1 for the Kelham Island Museum. As we as the remarkable engine being discussed (and it really can go pretty much into full chat from forward to reverse - a requirement for it driving the rolling mill) the rest of the museum is a wonderful insight into the Sheffield industrial heritage...
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