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Stringing steering wheels...
#21
Hi
I used black waxed string rather like Howard did. Directed by a post on the VSCC forum I looked up "French Whipping"; yes really, found it was also called French Hitching. There are lots of varieties. The one gives a spiral pattern which makes a nice grip. Perhaps visit a boat chandler as they often have lots of different sizes of paracord. As Howard noted you do use a lot and that can be a problem when passing through to make the knot. Still if the wheel is in the car its becomes a comfortable sitting down job!

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#22
I purchased new rear springs for my restoration and greased these prior to binding them in accordance with the paper included in Lowespeed’s note. I purchased and used the 2.5mm hemp thread as described.
When complete I covered the string with Denso tape to prevent dirt and moisture ingress, hopefully!
Denis S
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#23
I used white cotton string 1.5mm diameter on the Austin wheel. It's a little thin but fine. On my Riley 9 with an 18 inch diameter wheel I used 2.5mm and it looks much better. I used white macramre cord with a simple wrap around. The Riley wheel is 4 spoke so I did four quarters. The wheel is approx 1" rim diameter so say 3 and a bit inches per wrap. It needed 115 turns per quarter so 460 all up. Working it out roughly, converting to metric, adding a bit since it's a Monday, it's about 40 metres worth.

For finish on both I did what Joss suggested (always wise) and every time I am working on old, oily and greasy parts (often it seems) I just rub my dirty hands on the wheel. Builds up a nice protective layer of grime and a suitably vintage patina!

Simon
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#24
hi R,

we know you wanted thong binding really, just didnt want it on your serch history Wink
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#25
Found out, again!!

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#26
I use a thick brown cord from an upholsterer, the stuff they use to locate the springs in a traditional sprung seat.  Being thick you need less turns and it is a damn sight easier on the old hands.  It takes about 20 minutes to do each section between the spokes of the wheel.  Each section is done individually, there is no fancy stuff around the spokes, that is left to the MG men! I don't do the fancy French whipping stuff either and I think the nobbles on the rim could make that difficult if you tried.  I call my system Yorkshire Whipping!  When you finish you leave the last half dozen loops slack so that you can feed the cord back through on the reverse side where it is not visible.  Pull the end of the cord with a pair of pliers carefully and the loose loops tighten up and grip the end of the cord which is then cut off with a sharp knife.  The finish is a bit rustic and hairy at first, which you might like, but like Mark I give the cord a couple of coats of satin varnish which soaks in and sets hard, then a light sanding and more varnish if you want.  I generally strip the old plastic off the rim and spokes and give the rim a coat of smooth black Hammerite, leaving the spokes as polished aluminium.   Cost works out at about £2 a wheel.
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#27
Malcolm did the wheel on his GE Brooklands - which is now mine -  and I can vouch for its efficacy!
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#28
            Photo of the Ulster rep steering wheel.
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#29
I used 5mm nylon cord and employed a clove hitch at each spoke (overlap behind) which leaves a gap in the binding but when you get to the end you can use white polycotton thread to sew the two ( lightly fused ) ends into a final clove hitch making the join almost invisible. Around 30 metres required for a 16" wheel so a little less for an Austin.
It looks very white to start with but soon picks up sweat, oil and dirt to develop a good patina.
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#30
Is it string binding that you really want or too repair the wheel ?. An alternative is to put four coats of Smoothrite on flattening after each coat. Looks very similar to original.
I am always interested in any information about Rosengart details or current owners.
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