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Fixing a spare wheel on a special body
#1
Hi

I have stripped and fettled our special and would like to attach the spare wheel to the back of the car, behind the petrol tank. Please see picture attached of the back end of the car at present. The body has been removed.

As you will see, there are two chassis extensions and a cross member that support the framework for the body at the back as well as the mounting for the tank. You will also see a couple of steel bands forming a well inside the framework, which is where the spare wheel has sat previously.

I would appreciate any advice/suggestions on the best type of mounting to make to fit the spare wheel securely right behind the petrol tank, although not touching it.  

I have a couple of ideas but am not sure if they are that good.

Many thanks

Rod Shaw    
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#2
Assuming you want to free up some interior space, could it not go on top - a lot of simple gravity - so you don't have too much extra weight to engineer a safe rear overhang?
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#3
On mine there are two horizontal strips connecting the two vertical petrol tank straps like you have.

There is the spare wheel carrier from the original car rivetted to these, the spare wheel goes on the carrier.

I do not have any support to the rear of the original chassis extensions, the weight of the tank and wheel is taken on the ash and aluminium body.

You have a massive amount of support compared to what I have.

I would  put little rubber strips between your tank straps and the tank, whatever you do with the spare wheel.
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#4
Thanks to JonE and SA Simon.

I had not really thought about putting the wheel flat on the top but am considering it now.

The point about the amount of support available and using the tank straps is also good. I could make stronger straps/petrol tank mountings to fix the wheel to and appreciate the rubber strips suggestion. I could source a spare wheel carrier (?) or make something to suit, I think.

Thanks again and any more thoughts appreciated.
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#5
Don't carry one. It just slows you down. Tyre levers and a puncture repair outfit are much lighter! I never had a puncture in 25 years of driving and racing my A7 special.
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#6
I would concur with Terry, I also never carry a spare, just levers, repair kit and a spare tube.
Black Art Enthusiast 
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#7
Wouldn't say I never carry one, but I concur with Terry & Ian.
A spare wheel is a lot of weight where it's not much wanted, and (in my car at least) consumes a lot of space which can otherwise be used for luggage.
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#8
Rod's car is used for trialling. To not have a spare is asking for trouble!! The extra weight is beneficial if it's in the right place.

Steve
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#9
I'm jealous of those who never seem to get punctures! Admittedly since I moved to our present house, where the majority of journeys involves mainly main road running, my puncture rate has dropped significantly (my last was probably over five years ago). Previously my work commute consisted of approximately 50% country lanes and 50% main roads, and I cannot recall a single year when I didn't get at least one puncture in my 'modern', and each year usually included a puncture or two in my hobby cars as well. I always carry a spare, and always check it's pressure before any significant journey even now (and I have always thrown away any 'space-saver' and replaced it with a full-size wheel and tyre; I would not consider buying a car without the facility to carry a full-size spare).
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#10
Re the rubber between the metal straps and petrol tank. Cut down bicycle inner tubes with the valve cut out to form a long tube then split it length ways. I used this to make rubbers between the glass and frame on the rear windows of my Ruby.

John Mason.
Would you believe it "Her who must be obeyed" refers to my Ruby as the toy.

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