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E10 fuel consultation
#11
(04-03-2020, 09:01 PM)David Stepney Wrote: Perhaps we should all get out in our Sevens more.last weekend, coming back from a shopping trip in Ruthin, I managed to keep 14 other motorists at 35mph on the uphill section  of the A494 between Glanyrafon and Bethel. (I stopped at Bethel and let them all past. They had all been very patient and I was beginning to feel guilty!)
Ha ha! Lovely!
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#12
Read in The Scotsman today that Unleaded will go to 10% but there may be some pumps giving 5%. Suoer unleaded will go to 5%.
A list of cars which are not compatible with alcohol will be provided - seems optimistic to me!
Jim
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#13
(05-03-2020, 03:03 PM)Renaud Wrote:
(04-03-2020, 09:01 PM)David Stepney Wrote: Perhaps we should all get out in our Sevens more.last weekend, coming back from a shopping trip in Ruthin, I managed to keep 14 other motorists at 35mph on the uphill section  of the A494 between Glanyrafon and Bethel. (I stopped at Bethel and let them all past. They had all been very patient and I was beginning to feel guilty!)
Ha ha! Lovely!

Austin Sevens have quite a following round here - usually on single carriageway A roads![Image: biggrin.png]
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#14
Very good manners David although we all love our sevens we have to realise they are from a different age. The youngest of them 80 years ago earlier ones even older. We have to make allowances for the moderns who travel a little faster. By pulling over to let faster traffic pass it keeps our older vehicles still welcome on our roads with interest to all road users.
I think most but not all of seven owners are also of a different age and that seems to go with good manners.

John Mason
Would you believe it "Her who must be obeyed" refers to my Ruby as the toy.

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#15
One thing I have noticed with drivers these days is that often they are very unwilling to overtake, or even manoeuvre from one lane to another (frequently on the dual carriageway into Leeds there will be a long queue of cars in the offside lane, but hardly anybody in the nearside). The width of a seven driven well over to the left leaves loads of room for a car to pass on most A roads, even with traffic coming the other way. More often than not I get a cheery wave from people for whom I have pulled over a little and waved on. The problem comes where you get a ditherer who will not pass under any circumstances and who then forms a rolling road block behind you.
I suspect I can now be classified officially as a grumpy old git!
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#16
You're spot on there Colin. It's usually not me that's causing the queue but the numpty immediately behind me that refuses to overtake but follows so close that others behind can't safely get past. I have found the French more tolerant of a 'taco' and get toots and flashes of support from many drivers of all ages. Keeeping out of their way however is good science.
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#17
(07-03-2020, 02:23 PM)Colin Wilks Wrote: One thing I have noticed with drivers these days is that often they are very unwilling to overtake, or even manoeuvre from one lane to another (frequently on the dual carriageway into Leeds there will be a long queue of cars in the offside lane, but hardly anybody in the nearside). The width of a seven driven well over to the left leaves loads of room for a car to pass on most A roads, even with traffic coming the other way. More often than not I get a cheery wave from people for whom I have pulled over a little and waved on. The problem comes where you get a ditherer who will not pass under any circumstances and who then forms a rolling road block behind you.
I suspect I can now be classified officially as a grumpy old git!

So you actually want people to overtake when traffic is coming the other way? On a single carriageway?   Never.
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#18
Hi Andrew
If I'm bowling along happily at 45 or 50 mph, then no I would not want someone squeezing past between me and oncoming traffic, but if I'm struggling up a hill I would prefer the car behind to get past me rather than sit on my tail. It all depends on speed and road conditions of course, but my point was there does seem to be an increasing number of drivers for whom a normal overtaking manoeuvre is a foreign concept. Quite understandable of course, since in modern traffic overtaking the car in front usually just serves to move you one space up a dreary queue.
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#19
(08-03-2020, 10:04 AM)Colin Wilks Wrote: Hi Andrew
If I'm bowling along happily at 45 or 50 mph, then no I would not want someone squeezing past between me and oncoming traffic, but if I'm struggling up a hill I would prefer the car behind to get past me rather than sit on my tail. It all depends on speed and road conditions of course, but my point was there does seem to be an increasing number of drivers for whom a normal overtaking manoeuvre is a foreign concept. Quite understandable of course, since in modern traffic overtaking the car in front usually just serves to move you one space up a dreary queue.

Colin, it seems we agree on a lot here, except the overtaking when traffic is coming the other way. For me that is a 'never'.
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#20
I too have noticed that there is a growing reluctance to overtake.
Couple of weeks ago I had nowhere to pull in on a slow pull and so was down to 25 or so. Car behind, large powerful Merc, could have passed me without thinking but wouldn't, just sat close. In the end the 2nd and 3rd cars overtook us both. They both had reduced visibility of course and the 3rd was mighty close to oncoming traffic.

Not sure what the answer is, but like many things in life we seem to be heading to extremes. Those happy to sit back and those desperate to get past you whatever the risk.

Andy
Enjoy yourself, it's later than you think!
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