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The Joss Campbell Special
#31
You are correct Russell the top one need not have a grease nipple, but I made all the replacement shackle pins the same before deciding to make the locking plate, so I screwed a nipple in to blank the end. ( We were previously going to locate the axle with the damper but I decided against for the reasons already stated ) The other side has a standard shackle with nipple to lubricate the spring bush, i guess I could have made a plain pin but they were done I couldn't be bothered to turn up another. I am not huge a fan of the rubber block solution as it still allows a far amount of movement especially after having covered a few miles, however I agree at 30 to 40 MPH entirely adequate.
Black Art Enthusiast
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#32
Hi Tony

"at each end"

I'm looking to put a rubber block on my front spring but...

Do you put a rubber block at each end of the spring?  Doesn't this stiffen up the spring too much and put too much reliance on the rubber for springing?

Cheers

Howard

PS a pic of the rubber block would be nice!
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#33
I'm wanting to do something like this on my rear springs. I think I may not have left enough clearance for full travel of the sprung axle as I get a slight clunk at unexpected bumps in the road. The contact point seems to be the head of the shackle rivet on the upper face of the assembled spring leaves
Is there an easy way to increase the clearance other than raising the body from the chassis?
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#34
I have a rubber block at both ends of the front spring. They've been there since 2013 and about 10,000 miles.
There's no discernible change in spring stiffness and enough give in the rubber to allow flexing with no problem.
The steering is now absolutely predictable. I was thinking how well it steered the other day when doing 60mph on the Borders roads holding the wheel lightly between finger and thumb.
The tendency Sevens have to swerve has gone completely.

The rubber block is cut out of the tread of a small tyre (Citroen Saxo?). It is not a tight fit, only compressed when the spring tries to move.
Jim
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#35
It isn't a bolt, it is a proper shackle pin with a shoulder at each end so that when the nuts are done up rotational movement of the spring bush on the pin takes place.
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#36
Hi Jim

Thanks. If you are at Guildtown I'll be able to inspect in person!

Cheers

Howard
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#37
I am booked into Guildtown.
Jim
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#38
Having cleaned up, hot riveted and etch primed the floor pan, we today mounted it back on the chassis for a final fit and adjustment prior to paint and skin attachment. We also started to sort out locations and drill fixings for things like cut out, tool box, wiring loom holes etc. 

   
   
Black Art Enthusiast
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#39
Looking very good.
(BTW I'm also fascinated to know that the motor-cycle hiding behind the bicycle is? When can we see that being restored?)
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#40
Duncan, the bike behind the BSA winged wheel is a vintage Triumph, 1927 I think from memory, it is next in line for restoration once the special is finished.
Black Art Enthusiast
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