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Oil tight Austin Seven?
#41
(05-10-2018, 09:31 AM)Chris KC Wrote: It's technically interesting and could even be quite cool if the motor were something antique with lots of brass and copper....but the essential justification appears to be that the owner is appalled by vintage machinery...

With this being my 14th (or is it 15th) A7 since I started in 1963, I'm more than familiar with the 2psi 'spit & hope' engine lubrication, the crank-case compression fumes, vicious clutch, useless 1st gear, 6 volt dynamo's, chipped flywheel and leaking oil into the clutch, not to mention the lack of a heater. Removing EVERYTHING saved >240 kilo's and electric offers an improvable FUTURE when petrol will be TOO expensive to buy and a cost on the planet. Every one of my A7's was a rescue.
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#42
(09-10-2018, 08:17 PM)DazeOff Wrote:
(05-10-2018, 09:31 AM)Chris KC Wrote: It's technically interesting and could even be quite cool if the motor were something antique with lots of brass and copper....but the essential justification appears to be that the owner is appalled by vintage machinery...

With this being my 14th (or is it 15th) A7 since I started in 1963, I'm more than familiar with the 2psi 'spit & hope' engine lubrication, the crank-case compression fumes, vicious clutch, useless 1st gear, 6 volt dynamo's, chipped flywheel and leaking oil into the clutch, not to mention the lack of a heater. Removing EVERYTHING saved >240 kilo's and electric offers an improvable FUTURE when petrol will be TOO expensive to buy and a cost on the planet. Every one of my A7's was a rescue.

But then why not just buy a Twizy?
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#43
(09-10-2018, 08:28 PM)Chris KC Wrote:
(09-10-2018, 08:17 PM)DazeOff Wrote:
(05-10-2018, 09:31 AM)Chris KC Wrote: It's technically interesting and could even be quite cool if the motor were something antique with lots of brass and copper....but the essential justification appears to be that the owner is appalled by vintage machinery...

With this being my 14th (or is it 15th) A7 since I started in 1963, I'm more than familiar with the 2psi 'spit & hope' engine lubrication, the crank-case compression fumes, vicious clutch, useless 1st gear, 6 volt dynamo's, chipped flywheel and leaking oil into the clutch, not to mention the lack of a heater. Removing EVERYTHING saved >240 kilo's and electric offers an improvable FUTURE when petrol will be TOO expensive to buy and a cost on the planet. Every one of my A7's was a rescue.

But then why not just buy a Twizy?
The 'Twizy' is a modern quadracycle and basically a 'mobility' 4 wheeler. I may be 71 but don't need mobility or modern (I have new Volvo monster XC60 which is THE most horrible modern load of shite anyone could drive). Electrifying an RP - IMO one of the best A7 shapes, the ultimate conversion

   
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#44
(09-10-2018, 10:08 AM)JonE Wrote: well, trying to be as optimistic as possible, at least he didn't do it on an even earlier, rarer car.

At least the body is staying with the car, which is not something which can always be said with ulsteroids...
Why is there so much fuss, it’s only an RP , there are plenty around but perhaps only one electric.
It appears to have made available lots of parts for others.It has an owner, and it is his car to do as he wishes.
At some later stage this if it is offered for sale it can be returned to standard.
Nobody seams to make such a fuss when an alternative petrol engine is fitted.
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#45
I think this is the way forward: [Only registered and activated users can see the links Click here to register]

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#46
(09-10-2018, 09:43 PM)Ruairidh Dunford Wrote: [Only registered and activated users can see the links Click here to register]

Wow!  Much better and we can still use an original unmolested Austin 7 !

Here we have to use brown coal to generate the power to charge those awful battery cars and then dispose of the nasty old batteries after a brief few years of use.

Cheers, Tony.
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#47
(09-10-2018, 08:46 PM)DazeOff Wrote:
(09-10-2018, 08:28 PM)Chris KC Wrote:
(09-10-2018, 08:17 PM)DazeOff Wrote:
(05-10-2018, 09:31 AM)Chris KC Wrote: It's technically interesting and could even be quite cool if the motor were something antique with lots of brass and copper....but the essential justification appears to be that the owner is appalled by vintage machinery...

With this being my 14th (or is it 15th) A7 since I started in 1963, I'm more than familiar with the 2psi 'spit & hope' engine lubrication, the crank-case compression fumes, vicious clutch, useless 1st gear, 6 volt dynamo's, chipped flywheel and leaking oil into the clutch, not to mention the lack of a heater. Removing EVERYTHING saved >240 kilo's and electric offers an improvable FUTURE when petrol will be TOO expensive to buy and a cost on the planet. Every one of my A7's was a rescue.

But then why not just buy a Twizy?
The 'Twizy' is a modern quadracycle and basically a 'mobility' 4 wheeler. I may be 71 but don't need mobility or modern (I have new Volvo monster XC60 which is THE most horrible modern load of shite anyone could drive). Electrifying an RP - IMO one of the best A7 shapes, the ultimate conversion

I've often thought of the novelty of an electric 7. it would have to be a special or fully reversible swap for me.
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#48
(10-10-2018, 07:52 AM)Duncan Logan Wrote: I've often thought of the novelty of an electric 7. it would have to be a special or fully reversible swap for me.

I can't say I don't find the project interesting, my dad would have loved it I'm sure! I will certainly take a good look if I come across the car at a rally somewhere.
What it contributes to the future of motoring I wouldn't like to say; personally I hold no hope for the planet while there are humans on it.
I'm a little saddened by the 'make-over' (let's say) of an apparently sound & fairly original car, but as somebody said above it's hardly fair to point fingers when many members are equally 'guilty' of this.
Won't it be a pity though at the next JOGLE having to watch everyone zoom past somewhere around Inverness? And I'm still trying to imagine my baby without the song of her engine....
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#49
Yes, let's face it, there are going to be a hell of lot of dusty Austin 7s waiting for a few hundred years until the remaining humanoid planet dwellers come back to sufficient numbers to be bothered to want to drive somewhere. Time to sell up if you live near the beach...
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#50
I wonder what my ancestor who was "a driver to the steam plough" thought when they put an infernal combustion engine in his machine in the 19th century?
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