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austin ulster replica
#1
What's the approximate rate for spraying my ( bare aluminium ) ulster body and mudguards ?
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#2
(09-06-2018, 01:25 PM)lolforre43 Wrote: What's the approximate rate for spraying my ( bare aluminium ) ulster body and mudguards ?

Depends where you are and what standard of work you aspire to. I was quoted £1500 to (re-)spray the bodyshell alone - no wings, rad shell etc. I ended up doing it with a brush.
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#3
(09-06-2018, 06:59 PM)Chris KC Thanks for that. So £2,500 for body shell, mudguards and stays is not too wide of the mark. Wrote:
(09-06-2018, 01:25 PM)lolforre43 Wrote: What's the approximate rate for spraying my ( bare aluminium ) ulster body and mudguards ?

Depends where you are and what standard of work you aspire to. I was quoted £1500 to (re-)spray the bodyshell alone - no wings, rad shell etc. I ended up doing it with a brush.
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#4
lolforre43
[quote pid='11378' dateline='1528630084']
(09-06-2018, 06:59 PM)Chris KC  Thanks for that. So £2,500 for body shell, mudguards and stays is not too wide of the mark. Wrote:
(09-06-2018, 01:25 PM)lolforre43 Wrote: What's the approximate rate for spraying my ( bare aluminium ) ulster body and mudguards ?

Depends where you are and what standard of work you aspire to. I was quoted £1500 to (re-)spray the bodyshell alone - no wings, rad shell etc. I ended up doing it with a brush.

[/quote]

I asked around at the time and most people reckoned £1500 for the shell wasn't bad, in the London area at least, so £2500 for the whole thing doesn't seem far out.  I'd want to see something the same guy had painted. You might do better 'oop north'. That was to paint with 2-pack by the way.

If you hope to achieve the same results with a brush you might be disappointed, and it is a huge amount of work. Cash cheap though - a couple of hundred perhaps.

Or if you are handy and have space spray it yourself? I think I'm right in saying Craftmaster supply cellulose in original Austin colours.
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#5
Someone I know painted his car in 2011 for under £50. That didn't include the two pack etch primer he was given. It lives indoors and does few miles so the paint doesn't have to be tough like an everyday car. The particular paint was chosen on price.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzIabkXSa2M&t=69s

Mine isn't painted at all - so that's for free Smile I like the idea of brush painting, and from experience painting furniture I've made that's either more time than you think times about ten (with a lot of care and really good light) or liking the "brush painted look" as part of the car's "period charm": that period being "1950s austerity motoring".

There was a recent edition of practical classics with a green Cortina on the front. The guy who restored that has since rattle can painted another car (or two?) to a show standard. The story went that he'd done the interior etc with cans and felt he'd done a better job that the pro had on the outside so for his next project did the whole car himself. I've no idea how much time or how much the materials spent. I'd love them to write it up or have a go on one of their projects. "Rattlecan respray" as a search on YouTube returns some inspiration.

Anyone here any recent rattlecan experience or advice?
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#6
if you can properly flat back the paint's upper surface, then it doesnt matter how you put it on! But you need a thick enough layer to allow for any imperfections that you didn't remove in prep.
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#7
These may help you decide, professional or DIY:-

http://www.theminiforum.co.uk/forums/top...can-paint/

http://wiki.club8090.co.uk/index.php/Bod...r_painting
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#8
(10-06-2018, 03:20 PM)DavidL Wrote: I like the idea of brush painting, and from experience painting furniture I've made that's either more time than you think times about ten (with a lot of care and really good light) or liking the "brush painted look" as part of the car's "period charm": that period being "1950s austerity motoring".

If I'm honest my decision to brush paint my car set me back a year; though I was aiming for a fairly good standard of work. There is a definite (and rather elusive) knack to it. If you look at my car critically you will find a few glaringly obvious faults, stand back 10 feet and you'll think it was professionally sprayed. No, I don't like cars covered in brush marks (or roller stipple), but I'd much rather look at an honest job by an amateur than a very costly pro re-spray, which can easily suck the character out of a vintage car. I would caution anyone lured by youtube videos that many of the 'cheap' methods will not result in a durable (or even passable) finish - looking at a photo is not the same as looking at a car. I was rather tempted by the enamel / roller job which has many followers in the states - but ask any coachpainter about adding 50% white spirit to gloss enamel...
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#9
Thanks to everyone for their advice; it's certainly given me a lot to think about.
On a similar topic ( i.e. Ulsters ) what's the view of other owners on exterior mounted handbrakes ?  I'm not especially big but moving the handbrake would give my legs a little more room to move. Is such an alteration straightforward ?
As a new owner I have a number of ideas for alterations I'd like to make and feel the Ulster, with its relatively modern body ( by Rod Yates ) won't look too adulterated by changes, albeit modest.
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#10
Not much experience in spraying but have done a Land Rover and a moped, both from bare metal, the Land Rover in bronze green had slight orange peal to the finish in places, but this could have been buffed out and the moped in matt black came out more or less perfect. I used a small touch up spray gun as it is lighter and easier to control than the normal sized spray gun, I mixed up small batches of paint accurately as I went along in both cases. Have a good play around with the spray gun to set it up and set the pressure on the compressor to a couple of PSI between on and off and add at least one water trap into the spray line, once you are happy with the spray jet and the distance to hold the gun away from the job its pretty simple to get a reasonable finish. With the Land Rover I sprayed more or less a panel at a time working around the car. The self etch primer and primer are easy to do, by applying multiple thin coats, when dry check for any imperfections rub down, fill to correct, then apply the top coat again in multiple thin layers and slowly building up the paint. If it all goes wrong with the top coat it can always be rubbed down and redone, you can buy a hell of a lot of paint for £1000 to £1500!
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