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rear axle casing bend?
#11
If you don’t mind resorting to a bit of agricultural engineering of the budging kind, I’ve straightened an axle wit a bend like that with ratchet straps, a length of scaffold pole and a bottle jack!

No Seven parts I have go down the tip these days, I’m being super green and bringing them back to life any way I can.
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#12
If it has been run like that the whole end of the axle shaft would warrant crack testing. Even with the pinion removed the complete  axle is quite heavy to manhandle. Innards can be withdrawn  from the other side, noting recent post on topic.
Hard wooden blocks can be shaped to avoid pressing flats on the axle tube. But without an assortment of heavy angle iron  needs some ingenuity to contain a powerful jack. Have often seen moderat lengths of heavy threaded rod at swap meets etc. Handy for such situations. All my many spare axle houisings got turned into axle stands eons ago.... never occurred to check for bends! Cannot be too rare, but does position of brake cam vary? 
Could spend hours trying to straighten and checking  outcome. The axle end spigot has to remain square  to the diff mid split, and  concentric.
Panelbeaters have gear but would need some quick as you go alignment check jig to save time.
Hard to imagine how would occur without backplate and hub damage.
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#13
(21-12-2021, 10:25 PM)Ivor Hawkins Wrote: If you don’t mind resorting to a bit of agricultural engineering of the budging kind, I’ve straightened an axle wit a bend like that with ratchet straps, a length of scaffold pole and a bottle jack!

It seems silly not to have a go as I have nothing to lose, and all the detail of concentricity must link slightly to getting the spring pin holes lining up! BUT with the bend so close to the end, how would one create the jig to put a bottle jack in? I've got the lorry straps and short scaffold poles... and can make some holders for the axle tube.

Sadly we can't see the cause of the damage. The hubs were separated and I think someone had had a go at mildly assembling in 1970s... hence the blue paint. Over earlier cream!
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#14
That close to the backplate you're going to need a press, and I suspect a big warm spanner.
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#15
Jon

What axle is it?

If its a D type, just rebuild with new trumpet. I probably have 3 or 4 empty casings here, as I suspect do a lot of people.

If its banjo type that option exists, but the bits are harder to find, but available. Other option (assuming the axle tubes are the same diameter - and I think they are) if you cant find one is to lop off the axle tube at the good side of the bend. Use a spare D type trumpet. do the opposite and weld together. Clearly lots of measurements needed, and a bit of thought. A internal sleeve solution is the best way, but I have seen it done externally. The sort of boys who shorten chassis also narrow axles like this. Same goes if you want an offset jobby for your single seater.

That said, I dare say using the warm spanner and some thought, it could be straightened. Metal is like cheese when it is orange. I dare say some naysayers will give you some doom and gloom about metallurgy and strength. But nothing ventured is nothing gained. I wonder where the limit in bending capacity of the axle is, is it the tube bending (like yours) or pulling the bolts out of the casing. Hmm
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#16
(22-12-2021, 10:52 AM)JonE Wrote:
(21-12-2021, 10:25 PM)Ivor Hawkins Wrote: If you don’t mind resorting to a bit of agricultural engineering of the budging kind, I’ve straightened an axle wit a bend like that with ratchet straps, a length of scaffold pole and a bottle jack!

with the bend so close to the end, how would one create the jig to put a bottle jack in?

(22-12-2021, 11:16 AM)Reckless Rat Wrote: That close to the backplate you're going to need a press, and I suspect a big warm spanner.

something like this setup is all you'll need if you are using heat.

[Image: 33723379793_befdb23877.jpg]

The F750 racer axle above was straightened 'hot' - the actual bend was caused by the welded on 4 link brackets; the racer/owner found that the car was killing wheel bearings in short order. Oxy Acetylene/Oxy propane heat applied on the inside of the bend with the jack pressing against the outside of the bend. You'll only need a small spot of dull cherry red on the inside of the bend and a small amount of force will move it. I have done truck axles with a tube wall thickness of 1/4" plus with this same setup.

If you find you need some 'fine tuning' after hot straightening and axle case as above, applying a bead of stick or MIG weld on the outside of the bend will pull the axle straighter as the weld cools. Obviously you will need 100+ amps or so to push in plenty of heat when you do this. Grind the weld off afterwards without putting in too much heat and the new 'set' will stay in place.
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#17
realistically, its not going to be me unless it just involves a BBQ cannister torch.
Hence my optimism for Ivor's route!
It's a late 27 Banjo axle, so I'll just start to explore after Xmas...
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#18
Hello Jon just returned from the Christmas shop, but Stuart’s illustration pretty much shows the set up, with the ratchet strap hard up against the backplate (chain recommend if using oxy acetylene!) then the bottle jack and the other strap about nine inches further along the axle towards the diff.

I used a four inch length of scaffold pole sliced in half between the bottle jack and the axle do it didn’t kink and straightened the axle cold and used the half shaft to gauge when the axle was straight....it was by no means precision engineering, but it worked!
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#19
Well, I've got the O/S case off and yes, can see where it needs to be manipulated. Weirdly, an extremely rusty but straight axle case of an age within 2 months of mine liberated a useable set of axle pin 'oles, brake cam 'ole BUT on taking the damaged one off, I can see that this may be an issue on the potential replacement? The bearing will fit in, but will it leak? This has, as usual, imported in upside-down - the corrosion is at the base of the axle side    
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#20
wouldnt worry me. Better than a bent one
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