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Austin Sevens in Australia - Printable Version

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Austin Sevens in Australia - Mike Costigan - 12-09-2020

Tony Johns seems to be having problems posting pictures on the Forum, so has asked me to post the following:

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This is an early Melbourne-printed brochure before S A Cheney was involved, when Austin Distributors was owned by Ralph Falkiner with showrooms in Queen Street, Melbourne. The brochure was printed to coincide with the 1925 Royal Melbourne Agricultural Show (note the date of Saturday 26th September on the cover). The front cover appears to show a Longbridge-bodied car in standard UK form with scuttle lights, whilst the inner photo depicts a car with locally-built body and the forward-mounted headlights necessary to comply with Australian lighting regulations.

The brochure has been kindly made available by David Zeunert, who has an extensive collection, much of which came from former car salesman, Fred Haynes - a long-serving employee of Austin Distributors. Here are some more of Fred's memorabilia:

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RE: Austin Sevens in Australia - Stuart Giles - 12-09-2020

Really interesting images and text. That Australian "Occasional Four Seater" body looks to be longer at the rear than the UK version, presumably these would have suffered even worse sagging/cracking than the UK version in that pre-rivetted chassis extension era.


RE: Austin Sevens in Australia - Mark McKibbin - 13-09-2020

(12-09-2020, 01:10 PM)Stuart Giles Wrote: Really interesting images and text. That Australian "Occasional Four Seater" body looks to be longer at the rear than the UK version, presumably these would have suffered even worse sagging/cracking than the UK version in that pre-rivetted chassis extension era.

But they would have been made of steel which may have made them stronger?


RE: Austin Sevens in Australia - Tony Johns - 14-11-2020

[attachment=12067][attachment=12068]           I thought I might try an attempt to post a very interesting photo forwarded to me by Ashley Tracey from an album belonging to Jack Cocks of Chewton in country Victoria. The photo caption reads.

'My second Austin 7, 1946 before I got my licence'.

Tony Press has confirmed that is a 1929 Ace built by James Flood, and it also shows the original tool box below the radiator complete with an opening lid to gain access to the crankhandle.

Jack Cocks owned several vintage cars over the years, including two 3 litre Bentleys and was a regular competitor at the nearby Mt Tarrengower Hillclimb.

Note same background for both photos, the Bentley photo dates from 1951.


RE: Austin Sevens in Australia - circeonya@hotmail.com - 14-11-2020

This car was built by Bill Sheehan in the distant past.  I believe the photos in green are pretty much as Bill built it.  The one in white with Bill standing beside it is the current guise.


RE: Austin Sevens in Australia - Bob Culver - 14-11-2020

re the first picture just how does anyone in a restrictive hemmed coat enter an early car? Do adults normally stand on the running board?


Native Cat Model - Tony Griffiths - 14-11-2020

One wonders what the "Native Cat" model was....


RE: Austin Sevens in Australia - JonE - 14-11-2020

The Spotted-tailed quoll didn't have quite such a ring to it.


RE: Austin Sevens in Australia - Julian Hunt - 15-11-2020

For those who missed it there is a fascinating thread on the Autosport Nostalgia Forum "Austin Seven Racing in Australia":


RE: Austin Sevens in Australia - Tony Johns - 26-11-2020

[attachment=12213]My interest in Austin 7's started with my great aunt's 1931 Tourer with coachwork by 'Queensland Motor Body Works'.
When the roads in Brisbane became too crowded to continue to ride her horse, complete with side saddle she purchased her first car which she retained for the rest of her life. She gave up driving in the 1950's but my aunt continued to take her out for a weekly drive for many years.
When the the second owner bought it to Melbourne in 1972 for the first National Austin 7 Rally in Australia it was unfortunate for him that my parents were also there and recognising the Austin were able to explain to him that it was not possible for him to have owned it for as long as he had stated on the entry form.
One unusual feature was the side curtains were in the style of a retractible Holland blind mounting on two pieces of timber built into the non fold down hood.
Apologies for the poor quality of the photo converted from a 1960's Kodak slide.
Tony Johns