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LED Headlights
#11
(07-02-2019, 04:34 PM)spannerman Wrote: Do the led headlight bulbs do  main dip or main dim?
Has I have found the h4 LEDs I've got do  main and dim not main and dip?

The H4 (12V) from CDRC work exactly the same as a halogen bulb and the light spread is almost the same, dipped and full beam, I thought that the dim-dip was in lieu of side lights - do modern cars still have that now that they mostly have running LED lights?
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#12
LEDs,
The reflectors in my RP have BPF lamp holders fitted with the correct 1933 glass fitted,and I use CD&RC leds.
They give good light spread,with the advantage that they can be used in poor day light only drawing 1.4 amps a pair.
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#13
Garry,
My 1929 fabric saloon is the same. Basically it doesn't have a main beam just headlights and sidelights.
I've investigated using the dual (main & dip) LED bulbs because my lamps are dual contact. They won't work because they have to be oriented correct correctly by rotating them and the bulb holder is fixed.
The headlights are adjusted to give the dipped beam.
Jim
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#14
Legally speaking there is no requirement to have dipping headlamps. The lighting regulations relate to the necessity of having a "matched pair" and also that if they are not capable of being dipped that they are permanently directed downwards so as not to dazzle oncoming traffic.

I only have LED rear lights. I did look at going LED for the head and sidelights but having only just recently invested in new lenses, rims, bulbs, glass and reflectors I decided that for the time being I cannot really justify the additional expense. I can count on the fingers of one hand the number of times I have been out in the dark in the car so it would be frivolous to spend money that would be better invested elsewhere. The 6v lights are fine for what I need.
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#15
I use LEDs for all the lamps but not the headlamps. As my car has modern reflectors I use Motor scooter halogens these are 35/30W rather than 60/55W the light output is adequate.  I bought then on Ebay they were a brand name and quite reasonably priced.
Cheers

Mark
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#16
The bulbs you have suggested to use  [Only registered and activated users can see the links Click here to register]) are utter rubbish. do not waste your money..... I've tried the 12v equivalent. Whilst they might be ever so slightly brighter than your incandescent 6v bulb and draw less current I'd suggest that you find a better solution and not waste your time or gamble the tenner....

I've converted my headlamp circuit to 12v through a 6v-12v dc-dc converter and originally tried the 12v version of your suggested bulbs to find them not very good at all - hardly any better than the 6v incendescent bulbs that were previously fitted. 
After a LOT of research I then bought a pair of these [Only registered and activated users can see the links Click here to register] - they give a MUCH brighter output and a proper beam pattern on dip. I have them fitted in 7" Lucas lenses in my 1938 ruby. I can actually now see where I'm going in any weather!



Ray
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#17
Ray
Can you give details of the 6v-12v dc-dc converter that you fitted? Supplier etc

Garry
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#18
Here you go, what I'm using...ebay's chinese finest!

[Only registered and activated users can see the links Click here to register]

Spec says it's capable of delivering 5A and has been happily running 2x25w (4 and a bit Amps) LED bulbs for the past 2 month (incl 40minute commutes to/from work in the dark for the whole of this week). No idea how durable it will be though so planning to carry a spare around just in case - the circuitboard is ~45mmx~25mm so doesn't exactly take up a lot of space
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#19
Well, I had a look at the existing headlight bulbs and realised that they’re actually 45/65 watt BPF not H4 although I’m not sure that makes much difference. Also I forgot to mention that the headlight glass is a modern obscured Stippolyte type finish and with the existing tungsten filament bulbs I’ve never had that much in the way of a beam.

The reason I was thinking of going to LED was not primarily for improved lighting but more because one of the headlights isn’t working so I need to do something anyway and at the same time I’d hoped to reduce the load on the dynamo and even be able to get home just on the battery if I had to.

So I’m trying to decide what to do without spending that much as now I’m retired I have to be careful about what I spend on the car.

As I see it I could either bite the bullet and go for the LED ones from CDRC but a pair comes to £55 which is more than I really wanted to spend.

Alternatively I did think about some 6v Halogen Headlight Bulbs which are 35/35watt so would slightly reduce the current and hopefully, at least when on dip, not be that much different in light output due to being halogen. This appears to be what Mark McKibbin has done.

The only advantage over LED is that the cost would be just £16 rather than £55 for LED and for less than the £39 saved I could potentially change the original rear light, two stop / tail lights and the side lights to LED.

What do you think?
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#20
(08-02-2019, 03:21 PM)fatcatvera Wrote: [Only registered and activated users can see the links Click here to register]

Spec says it's capable of delivering 5A and has been happily running 2x25w (4 and a bit Amps) LED bulbs for the past 2 month (incl 40minute commutes to/from work in the dark for the whole of this week). No idea how durable it will be though so planning to carry a spare around just in case - the circuitboard is ~45mmx~25mm so doesn't exactly take up a lot of space

Thanks for the link to the 6 to 12 volt converter. I'm going to buy a couple to run the air fuel ratio meter and the timing light. Saves having to get a 12 volt battery to run them.
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