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Austin valve removal tool probs...
#1
trying to remove valves, and the little Austin tool managed one but I notice the screw thread isn't completely parallel to valve stem, and is difficult to screw down once tension starts.
Is there anything I'm doing wrong, or do the tools distort over time and thus become ineffective?
It is collets on this one... is there something I am meant to do in prep before putting the tool end on to the end of the valve spring holder thing?
thanks
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#2
(09-01-2019, 11:10 PM)JonE Wrote: trying to remove valves, and the little Austin tool managed one but I notice the screw thread isn't completely parallel to valve stem, and is difficult to screw down once tension starts.
Is there anything I'm doing wrong, or do the tools distort over time and thus become ineffective?
It is collets on this one... is there something I am meant to do in prep before putting the tool end on to the end of the valve spring holder thing?
thanks

With the passage of time the collets can become quite firmly stuck in the retainer.
Apply some initial pressure, then tap the lower section of the tool adjacent to the retainer
which in most cases assist the retainer to come away.
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#3
(09-01-2019, 11:10 PM)JonE Wrote: trying to remove valves, and the little Austin tool managed one but I notice the screw thread isn't completely parallel to valve stem, and is difficult to screw down once tension starts.
Is there anything I'm doing wrong, or do the tools distort over time and thus become ineffective?
It is collets on this one... is there something I am meant to do in prep before putting the tool end on to the end of the valve spring holder thing?
thanks

I have seen a couple of tools distorted - the screw down should be vertical- they are fairly common so find a better one.

As suggested a tap on the collet holder could help.

Tony P.
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#4
I have got a modern - well, thirty-year-old! - lever action valve spring compressor which will fit and gets used for those really stubborn collets.
Rick

In deepest Norfolk
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#5
There also appear to be a number of differing sizes for these tools. I have one that I thought was for a seven but is the wrong size. Personally i'd save the Austin tool for emergencies and purchase a modern compressor for the job.
Cheers,
Stephen
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#6
(10-01-2019, 02:22 AM)Steve Bryant Wrote: There also appear to be a number of differing sizes for these tools. I have one that I thought was for a seven but is the wrong size. Personally i'd save the Austin tool for emergencies and purchase a modern compressor for the job.
Cheers,
Stephen

An Austin 10 one has a deeper frame throat and will work with the manifold on. (keep an eye out for one on E Bay)This is the best one for emergency valve jobs on the side of the road.
The original Seven spring compressors are cast steel and can be realigned if bent without fear of breaking.
Grasp one end in the vice and apply a big ring spanner judiciously to bend back to shape. Good for another 80 years at least.
Apply a good preload when using then tap the end of the screw sharply to break the taper.
Cheers Steve H.
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#7
Steve's comment reminds me of the following tool suggestion from Ian Moorcraft:


.jpg   UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_d311.jpg (Size: 122.79 KB / Downloads: 227)


.jpg   UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_d312.jpg (Size: 128.32 KB / Downloads: 226)


.jpg   UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_d310.jpg (Size: 182.3 KB / Downloads: 226)

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#8
right, well no excuses now!

some bending or some buying - and some sharp tapping to do... thanks all.
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#9
(10-01-2019, 10:07 AM)JonE Wrote: right, well no excuses now!

some bending or some buying - and some sharp tapping to do... thanks all.

Exactly-I hoped you would find those photos R !
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