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Chamber of (A7) horrors...
#1
The old website had a thread for pictures of bodges and parts well past their sell-by dates, so I was inspired to revive it after collecting a block I'd planned to have re-sleeved, from my local engineers. The block had been sleeved in the past and was out to +60, but when the old liners were pushed out this was what we found:

   

I know its not recommended that previously-sleeved blocks should have the operation repeated but thought it was worth a try, as I prefer to recycle parts whenever possible. In this case, quite apart from the rust damage, the old liners were oversize compared to what is commonly available today, and appear to be unobtainable. As the photo shows, several valve seats would have needed replacing and the top face needed a skim, so it has been consigned to the scrap pile (where it should have gone in the first place...)

Alastair
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#2
Back in 2004 I was given an RN saloon which had stood outside for 50 years, the bonnet and it's stay were a pile of rust on the cylinder head in which lay the Rist horn. the engine had 0.060" oversize pistons, on removing the side water inlet I wondered what I could see until I realised that I was looking at a hole in the cylinder wall through which I could see the liner.
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#3
   
When I bought my 1936 Nippy in 1968 while on holiday in England I checked it all over, had a new hood fitted and chassis extensions made to support the notorious Nippy "bum sag", changed the oil, etc. all in preparation for the drive back to Switzerland. My brother undertook this adventure and all went well, and probably rather noisily, until somewhere North of Freiburg in Germany when the transmission gave up. I drove there to carry out the rescue operation and we towed the Nippy all the way to my home near Fribourg in Switzerland. First thing to do prior to dismantling the rear axle was to let the oil out of the differential. But there was no oil - just metal filings and dust. I had omitted to check the oil level in the differential. The pinion looked like this........... The crown wheel teeth looked rather sad too!
Steve
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#4
(10-11-2018, 12:02 PM)Steve Berg Wrote: When I bought my 1936 Nippy in 1968 while on holiday in England I checked it all over, had a new hood fitted and chassis extensions made to support the notorious Nippy "bum sag", changed the oil, etc. all in preparation for the drive back to Switzerland. My brother undertook this adventure and all went well, and probably rather noisily, until somewhere North of Freiburg in Germany when the transmission gave up. I drove there to carry out the rescue operation and we towed the Nippy all the way to my home near Fribourg in Switzerland. First thing to do prior to dismantling the rear axle was to let the oil out of the differential. But there was no oil - just metal filings and dust. I had omitted to check the oil level in the differential. The pinion looked like this........... The crown wheel teeth looked rather sad too!
Steve

Same thing happened to my Nippy Steve! I drove 250 miles home from uni one Christmas and - not having access to a garage - decided the axle oil was probably alright rather than rolling around in 6" of snow to check it. Incredibly it finally went bang at the brow of the hill 1/2 mile from home and I was able to coast down to our back gate!!
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#5
This pinion was still running but had a lot of backlash when driving.

Terry.


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#6
Curiously owners complain of diff whine with apparently reasonable mesh patterns yet these presumably not too evident. 
Cars which have stood for years seem to eventually lose all oil.
The photos do ilustrate the wear step which can cause confusion if the mesh is altered and rides on it. Can normally remove with an oilstone or very, very carefully with a Dremell tool.
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#7
(11-11-2018, 09:27 AM)Bob Culver Wrote: Curiously owners complain of diff whine with apparently reasonable mesh patterns yet these presumably not too evident. 
Cars which have stood for years seem to eventually lose all oil.
The photos do ilustrate the wear step which can cause confusion if the mesh is altered and rides on it. Can normally remove with an oilstone or very, very carefully with a Dremell tool.

Mine most certainly whined but I chose not to hear it!
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#8
   
Whatever you do, don't take my word for it!

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