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Hershey 2018
#11
Hi R,

Your wish is my command.

This picture will never show the full extent of the car coral.

This is were cars for sale are lined up, if sellers have just brought a car in. Rather than have a stall.

Probably 100 to 200 cars in total.

   

I'm struggling with picture size?

But how's a Crosley for you.

   

Love the propeller on the front.

   
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#12
Love the photos and comments Tony, what a fascinating trip. I'm always amazed at the sheer size of the American classic car scene. As you say everything is bigger in America - apart from the Austins. I love the diversity of it too, not to mention the way-out styling.

The Austin coupe is a reasonable price (by their standards). I've seen quite a few for sale recently so I wonder if prices are dropping. Considering how few they made there always seem to be project cars around - like the little roadster.

Peter.
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#13
Love the photos,Tony. My GF's brother has their Dad's truck, a bit modified. Chevy, 1955. Flat head, I think. Not too big for UK roads.

Erich in Seattle
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#14
Hi Tony B
 
Your posts gems as usual.
Unlike motor bikes, old American cars fetch surprisingly little on American Pickers; the funeral coach seems expensive esp if not actually a hearse. I wonder if it emptied the oil bottles on the way there.
Mike and Frank make good TV. Know their stuff and normal people of human proportions, unlike many TV Americans, but there is an army behind the scenes. Danielle must be their best find although doubt if she ever actually sells anything. And the premises seems primarily a prop. Prices paid are astonishing  and the mark up modest. For all the running around they would lose if paid to take most of it away.
The eccentric old codgers and their junk are perturbing.....
The “Brewster” type of styling only lasted a year or two generally about 1933 and was branded "potato digger"; I have not seen any picture so extreme. Some bland rounded styling of the late 40s was labelled "cake of soap".
Do all the old English signs also have bullet holes? The bicycle sign looks to be very early 20th century. Can you date? I am surprised that tins are so collected. Unless kept in very dry conditions all rust sooner or later. 
The brake drums of the Bantam curious.
 
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#15
Bob, one style I remember as a kid was "pregnant Buick". I think it was later thirties or immediate post war. Small cars like Bantams and Crossley's are very much specialist cars. Of course, many Americans today, can't fit in them. As far as Pickers, I emailed them several times about an episode in Tennessee in which the camera panned past a Seven rad surround. I never heard back.

Erich in Seattle
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#16
Hi Bob,

Must admit I love the American pickers program, I just about watch it daily when I sit down for a tea.
Especially the early ones were obvious mistakes were made by the camera man etc.

My problem is the result of showing everyone what things can be worth. It caused an explosion in prices, now only the super rich can buy things.

There original intentions were good. But today it feels more like they sold there soles to the devil.

Here another couple of pics of a car there last year, I think going into the auction.

   

   

There are always expensive motorbikes there.

Still struggling with pic size for other motorcycles.

Enjoy this one in the meen time.

   

Sports Cadillac ?

   

Love this one.

   

Did the gunfight and bullet holes take it of the road.

   
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