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Chummy door cards
#11
I am fairly sure this is unadulterated and should be a good reference...

   
Whatever you do, don't take my word for it!

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#12
A spare ARR Ruby door I have here has the remaining original interior around the window attached with pins - no screws or cups.

Colin
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#13
This is all great information- many thanks all.
Thanks Russell, I found the thin  birch ply, available in 2 or 3 mm locally, so will get some and give it  go.
Like the photograph Ruairidh- I reckon with the standard of my craft skills I will get it looking pretty much like that from new!
My chummy is pretty tatty anyway, which is how I like them.

I  daydream about some old Rexine which has been buried in a shed for 70 years....
Some time ago I had a nice old Grahame White cyclecar, which came with a fantastic early chummy rear  seat back section- totally original and serviceable- I wish I had kept that now.
You live and learn (apparently).
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#14
(07-10-2018, 07:08 PM)Steve Clare Wrote: This is all great information- many thanks all.
Thanks Russell, I found the thin  birch ply, available in 2 or 3 mm locally, so will get some and give it  go.
Like the photograph Ruairidh- I reckon with the standard of my craft skills I will get it looking pretty much like that from new!
My chummy is pretty tatty anyway, which is how I like them.

I  daydream about some old Rexine which has been buried in a shed for 70 years....
Some time ago I had a nice old Grahame White cyclecar, which came with a fantastic early chummy rear  seat back section- totally original and serviceable- I wish I had kept that now.
You live and learn (apparently).

Steve, Robbins timber, Bedminster, marine grade. Rgds Gene
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#15
(07-10-2018, 07:30 PM)Zetomagneto Wrote:
(07-10-2018, 07:08 PM)Steve Clare Wrote: This is all great information- many thanks all.
Thanks Russell, I found the thin  birch ply, available in 2 or 3 mm locally, so will get some and give it  go.
Like the photograph Ruairidh- I reckon with the standard of my craft skills I will get it looking pretty much like that from new!
My chummy is pretty tatty anyway, which is how I like them.

I  daydream about some old Rexine which has been buried in a shed for 70 years....
Some time ago I had a nice old Grahame White cyclecar, which came with a fantastic early chummy rear  seat back section- totally original and serviceable- I wish I had kept that now.
You live and learn (apparently).

Steve, Robbins timber, Bedminster, marine grade. Rgds Gene
Reverting to gimp pins, friend (and now late) Ray Stevens did some research on Ruby door cards and claimed that they also were held on by gimp pins, so I guess the cup-washer/screw idea was, as suggested, a modern trimmers' idea.   Cheers,  Bill in Oz
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#16
(08-10-2018, 11:56 PM)Bill Sheehan Wrote: Reverting to gimp pins, friend (and now late) Ray Stevens did some research on Ruby door cards and claimed that they also were held on by gimp pins, so I guess the cup-washer/screw idea was, as suggested, a modern trimmers' idea.   Cheers,  Bill in Oz

I removed a set of what appeared to be original door cards from an mark 1 Ruby last week. They were held on by some sort of brads, with the odd nail where there framework had deteriorated to the point that a brad could not hold.

Jamie.
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#17
For my Ulster rep I used aircraft birch ply 1.5mm from Chiltern Timber. Fantastic stuff! You can cut it with scissors.
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#18
From another lovely car.

   
Whatever you do, don't take my word for it!

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#19
Gymp pins.... are decorative nails, with a small (say 2mm) head, often raised, various lengths. Used for attaching GYMP( woven braid such as Jon has pictured on another thread regarding Top Hat headlining).  Also used wherever upholstery fastenings will be viewed. I use hot melt glue these days for gymp braid.
Escutcheon pins.... are similar to the previous but have larger heads (say 3mm). They are used to anchor keyhole escutcheons, small nameplates AND the metal trim pieces at the end of "hidem binding". 
Upholstery pins....  are decorative broad headed (say 6mm or larger) plated or painted nails, usually short. These will be used to visibly fasten flat tape where an edge is to be concealed. Sometimes used side by side in rows with no tape.
Cut Tacks.... sharp, tapered, no rust protection, various head sizes and lengths, uses in all other areas where unseen e.g Hidem binding or under seat squabs, under braid, in fact anywhere you would now use staples. 
Staples.... need no explanation,quick and easy. Mechanical fastenings are better than glue in many cases. A TIP here, where a trim is thin say 3mm,  short cut tacks do not hold. Using a longer staple say 4mm but with the staplegun held over at 45degrees before firing, you get a stronger result.   Go to it guys  Russell
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#20
(07-10-2018, 07:08 PM)Steve Clare Wrote: I  daydream about some old Rexine which has been buried in a shed for 70 years....

Yes me too; meanwhile I had some 'Rexine' from David Nightingale which is a pretty close second.
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