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Oil tight Austin Seven?
#71
Of course they will.

Are you an Islay, Speyside, Highland or other kind of guy - just stocking up.... Big Grin Big Grin
Whatever you do, don't take my word for it!

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#72
I've always been partial to this: [Only registered and activated users can see the links Click here to register]

So obviously I need to be educated Smile
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#73
[attachment=4119 Wrote:stuartu pid='17555' dateline='1539244530']In addition to the points Simon raises, a further question that interests me is, will the infrastructure to supply enough power be in place?

We have been known to get power cuts if everyone switches on their electric ovens at the same time. It's all very well having 68% of your electricity provided from renewable sources but what fraction of the potential demand is that when everyone who currently has an ICE powered car is charging up their electric runabout? However clever the battery technology, you still need enough energy to feed it.

How long does it take to build a power station? How many more will we need?

Now may be the only time an electric vehicle is a practical proposition, while there aren't too many of them.

Regards,
Stuart
Ah don't worry the authorities have thought of what happens when there is no wind, STOR (Short Term Operating Reserve), which appears to be a well kept secret.  Basically if you have some spare money, you build a diesel powerstation using containerised truck engine gen sets and give the keys to the National grid who switch them on as required.


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#74
Dave, not just diesel power stations. My mate Chris having been made redundant when they shut Rugeley went to work in a tiny power station powered by a jet engine. Supposedly a top up job, it was running 24/7. As you can well imagine it didn't use a right lot of fuel........
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#75
(11-10-2018, 09:11 AM)Ruairidh Dunford Wrote: [Only registered and activated users can see the links Click here to register]

The basic problem, which most fail to acknowledge, is too many people.

Reduce the world population and you solve most of the environmental problems.  We are capable of doing this humanely and voluntarily once we ALL recognise the looming disasters of unrestrained overpopulation. If we don't choose to do this nature will do it for us, with catastrophies, droughts, extreme weather, sea level rise etc.

I'm pessimistic about us acting in time.  It puts the restriction of our joyous use of Austin 7s into perspective...
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#76
Thumbs Up 
(11-10-2018, 10:13 AM)Terry McGrath Wrote: The basic problem, which most fail to acknowledge, is too many people.

Reduce the world population and you solve most of the environmental problems.  We are capable of doing this humanely and voluntarily once we ALL recognise the looming disasters of unrestrained overpopulation. If we don't choose to do this nature will do it for us, with catastrophies, droughts, extreme weather, sea level rise etc.

I'm pessimistic about us acting in time.  It puts the restriction of our joyous use of Austin 7s into perspective...

AMEN to that brother
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#77
Too many people, with previously unparalleled expectations of what they will own and consume in their lifetimes.
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#78
(11-10-2018, 09:36 AM)jansens Wrote: I mean the idea of using plugged in EVs as short term storage. Same idea on a smaller but more distributed scale. I was never sure how consumers would take to the idea though, telling them you plug your car in to charge but sometimes we'll take power back out of it! And I am sure the power companies would find a way to charge you for both directions.

That's cool how the turbines at Cruachan work both ways around, as generators and as pumps.

In Victoria and New South Wales we are starting to build a pumped storage (better late than never? )

South Australia has a big battery (only one !)

Electric Cars are not a proposition, at least not with primarily coal fired power .

Alternative fuels?
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#79
My personal view on the project is "why?" What benefit are you likely to get from electrifying an RP? OK its your car and you can do what you like with it but I would have thought that running an 85 yr old car with all its quirks and foibles was what A7 ownership is all about. Even with electric power you'll still have an old banger with dodgy handling, crap braking and noisy transmission. If you want electric then forget the Twizy its pointless. Buy a Leaf or something similar.
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#80
What was removed that totalled 240 Kg, please?

Colin
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