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Rear Axle Half Shaft Changes.
#11
The compressed gaskets influence  the cw position and side bearing load or looseness. Chances are you will end up tinkering with the adj but if you can establish the existing compressed thickness' it is a guide. A direct change to sealant with no readjustment will overload the bearings. If there is no hint of pitting or rust would reuse expensive side bearings. Care necesary not to overload, press dents in and ruin.
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#12
The repair certainly displays resource. Could perhaps understand if done in place but obviously had to be done apart. Something to remember if stranded in Outer Mongolia. Most would attempt some sort of weld. Presumably the break was as Stuarts recent photo and cleaned up with very little removed. (As another axle with good taper but damage elsewhere is very unlikely, hopefully a good long axle was not sacrificed as donor!) Are transverse breaks away from the taper relatively common? Just when I thought crack testing of the accessible part was a 100% gaurantee! Under some conditions the torque on the wheel can be a few hundred pound ft so it is incredible that it stayed tight, although if a piece of very HT used and was tightened to formidable torque and the driver gentle may have worked for a long time. Maybe they just did a few Seven hops at the outset. Presumably it was lhs! (Nearside in Pomspeak)
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#13
(12-06-2018, 05:58 PM)JonE Wrote: Just trying to work out two secondhand halfshafts. 
Both are less than 22.5" - more like 22 1/4".
Of this measurement, approx 3/4" is the thread, so they are 21.5" to the end of the contact area.

They have different finishing to the toothed end... the clean one is 0.86" diameter (just behind the teeth), and there is more chamfer on the inner circle pictured. The tarnished one with less chamfer is 0.87". Tony's early and late measurements equate to 0.87 and 0.89 of an inch for the two shafts.

The 2 diameters of SWB shaft are apparently not interchangeable. Is this just because of the diff case bush alone? 

I presume both mine are "earlies"? Is the changeover to the fatter shaft came in with the last incarnation of the swb axle type (type III in the green Companion picture, accepting type 4 is the D type)?

From the 1923 Spare Parts book 353a the early Axle Shafts were BO 17 (offside) with left hand thread and BO 18 (nearside) with right hand thread. No length given. 

By 1925 SP Book 353h there was only one Axle Shaft BO 18 listed.

The June 1931 SP List 670f shows a new Axle Shaft BO 128.

November 1933 SP List 1029A  shows another new Axle Shaft BO 136 , by September 1936 listed as 1A 7181.

Unfortunately the cards don't seem to show details of the Axle Shaft changes

Cheers, Tony.
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#14
(14-06-2018, 01:48 AM)Bob Culver Wrote: The repair certainly displays resource. Could perhaps understand if done in place but obviously had to be done apart. Something to remember if stranded in Outer Mongolia. Most would attempt some sort of weld. Presumably the break was as Stuarts recent photo and cleaned up with very little removed. (As another axle with good taper but damage elsewhere is very unlikely, hopefully a good long axle was not sacrificed as donor!) Are transverse breaks away from the taper relatively common? Just when I thought crack testing of the accessible part was a 100% gaurantee! Under some conditions the torque on the wheel can be a few hundred pound ft so it is incredible that it stayed tight, although if a piece of very HT used and was tightened to formidable torque and the driver gentle may have worked for a long time. Maybe they just did a few Seven hops at the outset. Presumably it was lhs! (Nearside in Pomspeak)

The repair may have been done in UK (unlikely) or Hong Kong, or California or Ohio! I think it was probably a creative mod to the original when it broke. No it was the (RHD) offside. The nearside key way is not such a pretty sight, but will be ok (I hope!) as the tapers look reasonable. I will find out when I get the engine running.....
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#15
they do! 
Whilst the axle cases DONT change between 670D and F parts lists, the torque tubes do. But there is no seeming difference in the other diff innards, so presume an unrelated event?
Looking at the index card axle changes, I'm now unsure how to interpret - they seem more complicated than Green Companion suggests. And the experimental axle Sept 1930 only seems to be on 82 cars in all.

But what else happened at 126,384 chassis number when the halfshaft changeover occurs, that might have accounted for it?


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#16
(14-06-2018, 11:32 AM)JonE Wrote: they do! 
Whilst the axle cases DONT change between 670D and F parts lists, the torque tubes do. But there is no seeming difference in the other diff innards, so presume an unrelated event?
Looking at the index card axle changes, I'm now unsure how to interpret - they seem more complicated than Green Companion suggests. And the experimental axle Sept 1930 only seems to be on 82 cars in all.

But what else happened at 126,384 chassis number when the halfshaft changeover occurs, that might have accounted for it?

Well- I wasn't looking closely enough and skipped 'Differential Shaft' - looking for 'Axle Shaft'- which it is listed as in all the handbooks - should have read the numbers ! Blush

The axle number change would indicate the diff carrier end diameter change - together with the Bush change.

The lengths shown are 22 1/2" and 23 1/2" - I was looking for any indication of the 'short' axle shaft mentioned earlier.   

 Cheers, Tony.
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#17
Regarding the two piece axle.   Was it simply a long axle cut, threaded and made into a short axle?  When cut you have nearly an inch for that thread. Necessity being the mother of invention.
Peter
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#18
(14-06-2018, 07:34 PM)Spex Wrote: Regarding the two piece axle.   Was it simply a long axle cut, threaded and made into a short axle?  When cut you have nearly an inch for that thread. Necessity being the mother of invention.
Peter
Now there's a thought! It looks very possible If that was the case then it looks as if it did not break where it was pinned.
However I am not intending to repeat the fix & now have a shiny NEW shaft ready to go in.
David
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#19
If the repair had unscrewed it would have made for some vary puzzling diff symptoms!
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