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Distilled Water
#1
In theory using distilled water would be beneficial to the cooling system in reducing corrosion, together with a 20% mix of antifreeze and perhaps 3 % of a coolant mix. There has been a suggestion however that the water would seek to " normalise" to its usual chemical content and in doing so would actually be more aggressive. Does anyone have the knowledge or experience of using distiiled water ?
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#2
Having turned 60 last weekend, I am now officially an Old Fart, fully licenced to drone on about how much better everything used to be and how we never used to worry about "science".

For 46 years, I've used nothing but tap water in my A7s and other cars. There have been no noticeable corrosion issues in any of them.
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#3
I run a 1960s car and have maintained an inhibitor. Additives were seldom used prior. The internal difference cf Seven and other oldies I have owned is amazing. The iron seems especially well protected and remains as new. No rust scale at all.  No risk of brown patches in the bores! Soluble oil was fashionable years ago but hampers cooling and ruins hoses.

Anti freeze is too expensive for me but in Australasia there is Type B additive much more reasonable, but no frost protection.. Favoured for competition vehicles where low spec heat of anti freeze a disadvantage.

A catch container reduces the consumption.
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#4
A few years ago I went to the local block stitcher,at the time he was cursing about the RR 20/25 block he was repairing.He said Austin seven blocks were made of much better material than the Rolls Royce ones.
Does any one use fernox (central heating protector) in their cooling system?
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#5
(15-04-2018, 05:56 PM)Austin in the Shed Wrote: A few years ago I went to the local block stitcher,at the time he was cursing about the RR 20/25 block he was repairing.He said Austin seven blocks were made of much better material than the Rolls Royce ones.
Does any one use fernox (central heating protector) in their cooling system?

Yes, Fernox Alphi 11
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#6
When I was working in the trade in the 1960s, one of our customers used the stuff that lathes use for cooling/lubricating the tool/job. The water galleries in the block and head looked brand new.

Roly
1931 RN, 1935 APD
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#7
That will be the soluble oil that BC talked of.
I’ve always used water from the tap or water barrel. Although at times convenient rivers and streams, and on one occasion, Buttermere.
Alan Fairless
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#8
"The Austin Seven Book" (first published 1927, my edition 1947) says "Use only rain water, keep a rain water tub" and goes on to say a partial replacement with tap water will do no great harm but will over longer periods result in deposits of lime in the cooling system.

And who am I to argue with that?

Certainly back in the old days my old dad and his mates would always use water out of the water butt.

To some extent it makes a difference where you live. Here in Norfolk on the chalk our water is as hard as nails. I suspect if you live in a soft water area it's much less of an issue
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#9
If anyone Googles Nulon Corrosion Inhibitor will see the inexpensive additive concentrate. Same available in other brands so equivalent must be available in UK/Europe.
Owners practice frequent changes of fancy oils presumably to preserve their engines.....
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#10
above is up to 30% ethylene glycol, and 1% denatonium benzoate....according to chemwatch
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