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A7CA Magazine
#1
I know nothing about the goings on behind the scenes mentioned in another thread but as a new subscriber I have just received my first copy (2018B) of the magazine.
I have to say I'm very impressed. Very interesting content and I really like the look of it.
The icing on the cake for me was to see the sadly quite brief article about Big Sevens.
Are they "much maligned"? If so, I really don't understand why. I may be a bit biased Smile and although my experience of older Sevens is limited the Big Seven is very much a superior car and much more usable on modern roads. I had convinced myself I wanted an Opal until I actually rode in one but soon realised I'd rather have the big Seven. Nothing beats the charm of vintage Sevens of course.

Anyway, I digress. I just wanted to say I am pleased with my magazine.

Regards, John
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#2
(14-04-2018, 11:42 AM)John Penny Wrote: I know nothing about the goings on behind the scenes mentioned in another thread but as a new subscriber I have just received my first copy (2018B) of the magazine.
I have to say I'm very impressed. Very interesting content and I really like the look of it.
The icing on the cake for me was to see the sadly quite brief article about Big Sevens.
Are they "much maligned"? If so, I really don't understand why. I may be a bit biased Smile and although my experience of older Sevens is limited the Big Seven is very much a superior car and much more usable on modern roads. I had convinced myself I wanted an Opal until I actually rode in one but soon realised I'd rather have the big Seven. Nothing beats the charm of vintage Sevens of course.

Anyway, I digress. I just wanted to say I am pleased with my magazine.

Regards, John
Without doubt the Big 7 is a much more usable car in modern traffic.
However the accessibility to replacement parts makes them a much less attractive proposition I fear.

(14-04-2018, 11:42 AM)John Penny Wrote: I know nothing about the goings on behind the scenes mentioned in another thread but as a new subscriber I have just received my first copy (2018B) of the magazine.
I have to say I'm very impressed. Very interesting content and I really like the look of it.
The icing on the cake for me was to see the sadly quite brief article about Big Sevens.
Are they "much maligned"? If so, I really don't understand why. I may be a bit biased Smile and although my experience of older Sevens is limited the Big Seven is very much a superior car and much more usable on modern roads. I had convinced myself I wanted an Opal until I actually rode in one but soon realised I'd rather have the big Seven. Nothing beats the charm of vintage Sevens of course.

Anyway, I digress. I just wanted to say I am pleased with my magazine.

Regards, John
Without doubt the Big 7 is a much more usable car in modern traffic.
However the accessibility to replacement parts makes them a much less attractive proposition I fear.
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#3
However the accessibility to replacement parts makes them a much less attractive proposition I fear.


Yes, I have noticed the situation and I suspect I will find out as time goes on. That said, the 900cc engine seems a much smoother and stronger unit. The one in mine runs like a sewing machine and pulls like a train Big Grin

I haven't been an owner long enough to know if specific parts are problematic? I certainly hope to collect a few things for the parts bin as they become available.
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#4
I owned a Big 7 for 6 years and once I had cured the handling issues that made it difficult to steer, it was a very useable car. Ian is quite correct to say that parts availability is not as good a "baby" Seven, however, one must compare apples with apples, or in this case, a Big 7 with a 1938/9 Ruby, when it becomes apparent that there is some interchangeability in parts.
Hubs and many brake parts are the same as a late Ruby and most trim parts are either the same or close enough to be used. Most gearbox parts are the same and smaller pieces inside the back axle, together with the bearings can be swapped. Crown wheel and pinion is the same design but larger (longer pinion) and the half shafts are also similar but longer (wider axle). Front axle is unique and both front and back axle use screwed spring pin and shackle bushes, familiar to those of us who have worked on the suspension of the Austin A30 and its derivatives. These pins and bushes corrode and wear badly. They are currently unobtainable in original form.
Some new spares are sporadically made but there are no new engine parts in production at all. There have been a number of gasket, piston and bearing sets that have appeared on eBay recently, probably due to the sale and resale of the Kirby Whiske parts.
Girling brake linings are the same as the Ruby type and can be obtained from our cherished suppliers while wheel bearings are the same as a Ruby. Some other spares are available, either new or second hand from the Big 7 Registrar.
Second hand or NOS spares appear from time to time, usually at inflated prices (rare car innit mate??) but seldom seem to sell (after all it’s a rare car isn’t it?).
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#5
Thanks for that information. I had assumed there must be some interchangeability of parts.

In terms of handling, I do not have much experience of cars of this period but the only things I have noticed is that low speed steering is quite heavy, although it seems OK the road aside from some lack of self centering and there is also quite a bit of body roll but that just adds to the fun Smile

Regards, John
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