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Reviewed Book
#1
The current VSCC Bulletin has an expansive if unattributed review of "The Immortal Austin Seven"  by David Morgan, described as a colourfully presented history. I have yet to see the book reviewed in the Seven world, so at £45 plus p&p should it join the line of vital volumes already on our shelves? Perhaps if Veloce Publishing could send a review copy to me, or more likely Stuart Ulph, then a review could soon appear on the forum.
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#2
Steve

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#3
(08-04-2018, 09:32 PM)Steve kay Wrote: The current VSCC Bulletin has an expansive if unattributed review of "The Immortal Austin Seven"  by David Morgan, described as a colourfully presented history. I have yet to see the book reviewed in the Seven world, so at £45 plus p&p should it join the line of vital volumes already on our shelves? Perhaps if Veloce Publishing could send a review copy to me, or more likely Stuart Ulph, then a review could soon appear on the forum.

This book has been discussed a few times on the forum since it was published last year. 

It has some interesting information and pictures and can now be bought for quite a discounted price. 

I find the 'breakout' sections distracting and the curious claim that Herbert received some sixteen pounds for each car, but it is a colourful book and probably worth the discounted price. 

Veloce Publishing use their books to advertise their other books which presumably keeps costs down. 

I am even more impressed by the latest Veloce book on Austins- 'An Austin Anthology' by Jim Stringer just released and available from the Book Depository at a very good price- most interesting so far in my reading.

Cheers, Tony.
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#4
Tony - there is a single Amazon review which praises the Stringer book highly but not the production quality - have you seen it and do you agree? I must admit, seeing what you can buy it for, practically a tenner discounted - less that half of the Immortal - then what do we really expect?

I must admit, I'm not so worried about seeking the cheapest sites for books now. As authors make practically nothing anyway these days, its for all of us to make sure we order books from libraries or buy from anywhere just so they physically purchased and then get reprinted as a second edition! That authors' books will remain around long into the future, beyons all our lifespans, must be some compensation, I hope.
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#5
(09-04-2018, 01:05 PM)JonE Wrote: Tony - there is a single Amazon review which praises the Stringer book highly but not the production quality - have you seen it and do you agree? I must admit, seeing what you can buy it for, practically a tenner discounted - less that half of the Immortal - then what do we really expect?

I must admit, I'm not so worried about seeking the cheapest sites for books now. As authors make practically nothing anyway these days, its for all of us to make sure we order books from libraries or buy from anywhere just so they physically purchased and then get reprinted as a second edition! That authors' books will remain around long into the future, beyons all our lifespans, must be some compensation, I hope.

It is a small (A5?) book of 112 pages - no dust cover but in my view  well produced with gloss paper and hard cover in that excellent new style perfect binding unlike the old of a year or so back where the pages fall out.

Pictures are all black and white from original as you would expect, and there is an introduction by Bob Wyatt.

I am up to page 32 and find it very interesting - it is an Austin Book rather than an Austin Seven book but nonetheless some fascinating bits of history.

Cheers, Tony.
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#6
Ah, the ageing owner and their memory. I remember that the Ruby is in the workshop, but did not recall that David Morgan's book had inded provoked comment. One area was the strange world of publishing which included the statutory "grassy knoll" joke. The other was raising eyebrows about Morgan's claim that Sir Herbert might have recieved £14 in royalties for each car, every other reference gives a figure of two guineas or £2 10s. There seems to be no citing of sources justifying this differing view. Either the Bulletin's anonymous reviewer is no Seven historian, or like me had forgotten questions raised.

As for reviews, if anyone would like to review a book on the species of motor car made extinct by the Seven, that seminal volume "Cyclecars, an annotated index" let me know and I will post a copy right away.
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